Why Study Spanish at IU Southeast?

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The IU Southeast Spanish program develops the linguistic and intellectual agility that students need in order to thrive in an increasingly global society. In addition to the regular, four-semester sequence, we offer an accelerated track that enables highly motivated students to complete the language requirement in just two semesters. Spanish students at all levels can enhance their classroom experience by studying in Latin America or Spain and by participating in service learning projects that encourage engagement with members of the local Spanish-speaking community.

See "General Requirements for Undergraduate Degrees at IU Southeast" and "General Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts Degree."

Bachelor of Arts in Spanish

Requirements
  1. S 200 and S 250 (6 cr.)
  2. S 312 and S 317 (6 cr.)
  3. S 411 or S 412 (3 cr.)
  4. 12 credit hours from the following: S 275, S 291, S 301, S 302, S 303, S 311, S 363
  5. At least 3 credit hours from the following: S 407, S 408, S 419, S 420, S 450, S470, S 471, S 472, S 474, S 494 (S 494 is by arrangement)
  6. Students may choose to take additional 400-level courses in place of 300-level courses. This excludes S312 and S317, which are explicitly required.
  7. Native speakers are not allowed to take S 275, S 291, or S 317.

Minors

15 credit hours, including

  • S 200 Second-Year Spanish I (3 cr.)
  • S 250 Second-Year Spanish II (3 cr.)

Nine (9) creit hours of Spanish beyond S 250 (Choose 3 courses from the following: S 275, S 291, S 312, S 317 or another 300- or 400-level course)

Our graduates seek employment in a variety of fields, the most common of which are education, law, business, public service, and politics. The relatively recent growth of the Hispanic population in southern Indiana and Kentucky has created increased demand for interpreters and translators, making Spanish a valuable complement to most majors.

S100-S150 Elementary Spanish I-II (4-4 cr.)
Intensive introduction to present-day Spanish, with drills for mastery of phonology, basic structural patterns, and functional vocabulary. Attendance in the language lab may be required.

S100/S150 Combined (8 cr.) S200-S250 Second-Year Spanish I-II (3-3 cr.)
Intensive introduction to present-day Spanish, with drills for mastery of phonology, basic structural patterns, and functional vocabulary. Attendance in the language lab may be required. Coursemeets daily.

S200-S250 Intermidiate Spanish I-II (3-3 cr.)
Intensive drill reviewing important structural and vocabulary problems, coordinated with literary readings. II. Discussions in Spanish of contemporary Hispanic literature. Practice in composition both semesters. Attendance in the language lab may be required.

S200/S250 Combined (6 cr.)
Intensive drill reviewing important structural and vocabulary problems, coordinated with literary readings. II. Discussions in Spanish of contemporary Hispanic literature. Practice in composition both semesters. Attendance in the language lab may be required. Course meets daily.

S275/S291 Hispanic Culture and Conversation (3 cr.)
Practice of language skills through reading and discussion of Hispanic culture. Treats facets of popular culture, diversity of the Spanish-speaking world, and themes of social and political importance. Conducted in Spanish.

S301-S302-S303 The Hispanic World I-II-III (3-3-3 cr.)
Introduction to Hispanic culture through literature. Study of representative literary works from both Spain and Spanish America, in the context of Hispanic history,art,philosophy,folklore,etc.

S311 Spanish Grammar (3 cr.)
Review of the major points of Spanish grammar.

S312 Written Composition in Spanish (3 cr.)
Course integrates the four basic language skills into a structured approach to composition. Some review of selected points of Spanish grammar included. Emphasis on correct usage, vocabulary building, and stylistic control.

S317 Spanish Conversation and Diction (3 cr.)
Intensive controlled conversation correlated with readings, reports, debates, and group discussions. Spanish pronunciation and diction. May be repeated once for credit overseas.

S363 Introduction to Hispanic Culture (3 cr.)
Critical analysis of film, literature, and culture of the Spanish-Speaking world. Variable content. May be repeated once for credit.

S407 Survey of Spanish Literature I (3 cr.)
A historical survey that covers major authors, genres, periods, and movements from the Spanish Middle Ages through the Baroque period of the seventeenth century. Readings include prose works, poetry, and drama.

S408 Survey of Spanish Literature II (3 cr.)
A historical survey of Spanish literature that covers the main current of Spain's literary history in the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries. Readings include prose works, poetry, essay, and drama.

S411 Spanish Culture and Civilization (3 cr.)
A course to integrate historical, social, political, and cultural information about Spain.

S412 Latin American Culture and Civilization (3 cr.)
A course to integrate historical, social, political, and cultural information about Spanish America.

S419 Modern Spanish Prose Fiction (3 cr.)
Spanish prose fiction from mid-nineteenth-century realism through post-Spanish Civil War narrative innovations.

S420 Modern Spanish American Prose Fiction (3 cr.)
Spanish American prose fiction from late nineteenth-century modernism to the present.

S450 Don Quixote (3 cr.)
Detailed analysis of Cervantes' novel. Life and times of the author. Importance of the work to the development of the novel as an art form.

S470 Women and Hispanic Literature (3 cr.)
Hispanic women within cultural context through literary texts. Topics such as women authors, characters, themes, and feminist criticism.

S471 Survey of Spanish American Literature I (3 cr.)
A historical survey of Spanish American Literature. This course covers major authors, genres, periods, and movements from pre-Columbian times, through the Conquest and the Spanish Colonies, to the beginning of the Nineteenth Century when the Spanish American republics were born.

S472 Survey of Spanish American Literature II (3 cr.)
A historical survey of Spanish American Literature. This course covers major authors, genres, periods, and movements. This literary survey course begins in the nineteenth century when Spanish Colonial rule ended and most Spanish American countries became republics, and follows the growth of Spanish American literature up to the present day.

S494 Individual Readings in Hispanic Studies (1-3 cr.)

  

Resident

Faculty Bio Thumbnail
Tim Ambrose
Associate Professor of Spanish
tjambros@ius.edu
Phone: (812) 941-2232
Office Location: KV 110 R
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Faculty Bio Thumbnail
Mindy E. Badía
Associate Professor of Spanish and International Studies
mbadia@ius.edu
Phone: (812) 941-2620
Office Location: KV 110 C
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Faculty Bio Thumbnail
Amy E. Zink
Senior Lecturer in Spanish
azink01@ius.edu
Phone: (812) 941-2142
Office Location: KV 200M
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Modern Languages faculty members pursue active research agendas that enhance our teaching in meaningful ways and connect IU Southeast to a wider scholarly community.

Dr. Ambrose

Dr. Badía

Published work
  • “’Viene de Panamá’: Caribbean Music, Commodification and (Post) Colonialism in Cesar Oliva Olivares’s 1996 Adaptation of La dama boba.” Hybridity in Spanish Culture. Ed. María P. Tajes. Cambridge Scholars Press. 2011.
  • “La función de la música en una adaptación contemporánea de No hay burlas con el amor.” Ed. Antonio Azaustre Galiana and Santiago Fernández Mosquera.Compostella Aurea. Actas del VIII Congreso de la AISO. Universidad de Santiago de Compostela. 2011.
  • Crosscurrents: Transatlantic Perspectives on Early Modern Hispanic Drama Lewisburg: Bucknell UP, 2006. (Co-edited with Dr. Bonnie L. Gasior, California State Long Beach)
  • “Drag's Double-Edged Sword: El galán fantasma, 1985.” Comedia Performance. 3.1 2006. 53-69.
  • “The Politics of Staging the Church: Liberation Theology and the Golden Age auto sacramental." Proceedings of Salvation and Sovereignty: Church and State in the Americas Conference, March 2000, Baylor University. Ed. Joan E. Supplee, Lizbeth Souza Fuertes and Janet E. Adamski. Waco: Baylor UP. 27-33.
  • “Seeing is Dis-Believing: Performance Theory, Postcoloniality and El gran mercado del mundo." Gestos. 28(1999): 12-28.
  • "Performance Theory, Postcolonial Projects and Marta la Piadosa, 1986." On-stage Studies. 21(1998): 52-62.
  • "Clothes Make the Woman: Transvestism and Transgression in Tiempo Común's 1991 Staging of El acero de Madrid." Laberinto. (On-line journal at http://www.utsa.edu/laberinto.) 1997
  • "Dorotea's Autobiographies: Authority and Ambiguity in Don Quijote." Romance Languages Annual. 7(1995): 370-4.
Encyclopedia entries
  • “Calderón de la Barca, Pedro.” Feminist Encyclopedia of Spanish Literature. Ed. Janet Pérez and Maureen Ihrie. Westport: Greenwood Press, 2002. 83-7.
  • “Don Quijote de la Mancha.” Feminist Encyclopedia of Spanish Literature. Ed. Janet Pérez and Maureen Ihrie. Westport: Greenwood Press, 2002. 182-5.
  • “Dulcinea del Toboso.” Feminist Encyclopedia of Spanish Literature. Ed. Janet Pérez and Maureen Ihrie. Westport: Greenwood Press, 2002. 200-202.

Sigma Delta Pi, The Spanish National Honor Society

Facebook Page for IU Southeast Spanish Club

Some newspapers from the Spanish-speaking world

Association for Hispanic Classical Theater

Hispanic/Latino Coalition of Louisville

American Association of Teachers 0f Spanish and Portuguese

Amercian Council of Teaching of Foreign Languages

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