Why Study Philosophy at IU Southeast?

As the oldest and most foundational academic discipline, Philosophy is universally applicable and interdisciplinary by nature, and therefore serves as an excellent major, minor, or second major in conjunction with another discipline. Through the guided study of classic and contemporary philosophical texts, thinkers, and traditions, students hone their critical and analytical thinking skills, deepen their capacity for reasoning about ethical principles and moral problems, improve both their written and oral communication skills, and cultivate an openness to new ideas.

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What is Philosophy?

When Socrates exclaimed to his incredulous accusers, “I know you won't believe me, but I truly believe the highest human excellence is to question oneself and others,” he captured the spirit of all philosophical effort. Although philosophy has undergone profound changes since his time, it still seeks to come to terms with the questions and issues provoked by every phase of life, and it produces arguments and accounts bearing on every subject worthy of disciplined reflection.

Philosophy addresses questions like:

  • Are there limits to what we can know?
  • Can we know by reason that there is or is not a God?
  • Why should we be moral?
  • What is the best model for government and social organization?
  • Are our thoughts and actions free or are they determined by prior events?
  • Can anything be known?

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Requirements for Bachelor of Arts in Philosophy

In addition to meeting the Graduation Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts Degree listed in the Indiana University Southeast Bulletin, those majoring in philosophy must meet the requirements listed below.

The major in philosophy at IU Southeast has two tracks:

General Education Component for both tracks:

(Note: This is not a re-statement of the University’s General Education Requirement but a list of specific General Education courses which are also requirements or pre-requisites for course work in the school/major.)

Department Course # Description Credit Hours Minimum Grade
PHIL-P 100 Introduction to Philoosophy 3 C-
PHIL-P 140 Introduction to Ethics 3 C-
PHIL-P 150 Elementary Logic 3 C-
PHIL-P 170 Introduction to Asian Philosophy 3 C-

Minor in Philosophy

By completing 15 credit hours in philosophy, including 3 credit hours in logic and 9 credit hours at the 200 level or above, students can receive a minor in philosophy. Minoring in philosophy offers students working toward another major the opportunity to expand their studies and inform their work in other disciplines. It gives students a chance to address some of the ethical questions that will undoubtedly arise within the context of their chosen field, as well as to gain a stronger grasp of the philosophical and historical elements that contribute to the foundations of their discipline. In addition, minoring in philosophy helps the student to sharpen his or her analytic skills and to achieve a greater cultural awareness.

Visit the IU Southeast bulletin webpage for requirements needed to minor in philiosophy

Academic advisors help students understand degree requirements, but students alone are responsible for fulfilling those requirements. Students may access their transcript via the Internet at https://onestart.iu.edu. Advising is required in Arts & Letters, so you should contact your advisor early to make a specific appointment well in advance of registration dates.

General advising in the School of Arts & Letters

Gregory RobertsGregory Roberts
School of Arts and Letters (A&L)
Office: Knobview Hall 110
Phone: (812) 941-2342


Advising in Philosophy

Leigh VinerLeigh Viner
Coordinator of Philosophy, Religious Studies, and Humanities
Office: KV 200 G
Phone: (812) 941-2109
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Given the intellectual rigor and richness of a degree in Philosophy, our majors and minors are well prepared to pursue further study and training in graduate programs, or to succeed in a variety of career paths. A few examples of the professions pursued by our students include:

  • Lawyer
  • International Peace Corps worker
  • Entrepreneur
  • Social Service Administrator
  • Teacher
  • Librarian
  • Pastor
  • Bookstore manager
  • Journalist
  • Editor

PHIL–P 100 Introduction to Philosophy (3 cr.)
Perennial problems of philosophy, including problems in ethics, in epistemology and metaphysics, and in philosophy of religion. Readings in selected writings of philosophers from Plato to the present.

PHIL–P 140 Introduction to Ethics (3 cr.)
The study of classical ethics texts by Aristotle, Kant, Mill, and many others. Examination of some contemporary moral issues.

PHIL–P 145 Introduction to Social and Political Philosophy (3 cr.)
Fundamental problems of social and political philosophy: the nature of the state, political obligation, freedom and liberty, equality, justice, rights, social change, revolution, and community. Readings from classical and contemporary sources.

PHIL–P 150 Elementary Logic (3 cr.)
Development of critical tools for the analysis and evaluation of arguments.

PHIL–P 170 Intro to Asian Philosophy (3 cr.)
Survey of select philosophical traditions of India, China, and Japan, including Vedanta, Mahayana Buddhism, Confucianism, and Taoism. Topics include the nature of reality, ethical responsibility, and the role of the “self” in creating ignorance and attaining enlightenment.

PHIL–P 200 Problems of Philosophy (3 cr.)
P: ENG-W 131. Selected writings of modern philosophers concerning some important philosophical problems.

PHIL–P 237 Environmental Ethics (3 cr.)
P: ENG-W 131. An introductory consideration of philosophical views regarding the extent of human responsibility for the natural environment.

PHIL–P 240 Business and Morality (3 cr.)
P: ENG-W 131. Fundamental issues of moral philosophy in a business context. Application of moral theory to issues such as the ethics of investment, moral assessment of corporations, and duties of vocation.

PHIL–P 250 Symbolic Logic I (3 cr.)
Propositional logic and first-order quantificational logic.

PHIL–P 251 Intermediate Symbolic Logic (3 cr.)
P: ENG-W 131 Identity, definite descriptions, properties of formal theories, elementary set theory.

PHIL–P 302 Medieval Philosophy (3 cr.)
P: ENG-W131; 6 credit hours in philosophy. A survey including Augustine, Boethius, Anselm, Abelard, Bonaventure, Aquinas, Duns Scotus, Ockham, and Nicholas of Cusa.

PHIL–P 304 Nineteenth-Century Philosophy (3 cr.)
P: ENG-W 131; 6 credit hours in philosophy. Selected survey of post-Kantian philosophy, including Hegel, Marx, Kierkegaard, Mill.

PHIL–P 310 Topics in Metaphysics (3 cr.)
P: ENG-W 131; 6 credit hours of philosophy. Topics such as existence, individuation, contingency, universals and particulars, causality, determinism, space, time, events and change, relation of mental and physical.

PHIL–P 313 Theories of Knowledge (3 cr.)
P: ENG-W 131; 6 credit hours in philosophy. Topics such as the nature of knowledge; the relation of knowledge and belief, of knowledge and evidence, of knowledge and certainty; and the problem of skepticism.

PHIL–P 314 Modern Philosophy (3 cr.)
P: ENG-W 131; 6 credit hours in philosophy. A study of Western philosophy in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, dealing with such philosophers as Bacon, Descartes, Berkeley, Hume, Leibniz, and Kant.

PHIL–P 316 Twentieth Century Philosophy (3 cr.)
P: ENG-W 131; 6 credit hours in philosophy. Study of select problems in twentieth century philosophy.

PHIL–P 319 American Pragmatism (3 cr.)
P: ENG-W 131; 6 credits of philosophy. Examination of the central doctrines of Peirce, James, Dewey, Mead.

PHIL–P 320 Philosophy and Language (3 cr.)
P: ENG-W 131; 6 credit hours in philosophy. A study of selected philosophical problems concerning language and their bearing on traditional problems in philosophy.

PHIL–P 330 Marxist Philosophy (3 cr.)
P: ENG-W 131; 6 credit hours in philosophy. An examination of major philosophical issues in Marxist theory. Historical materialism and the critique of idealism in metaphysics, the theory of knowledge, ethics, and social science. Discussion of both classical and contemporary sources.

PHIL–P 333 Philosophy Seminar (3 cr.)
P: ENG-W 131; 9 credit hours in philosophy. Careful collaborative study of selected texts from the history of philosophy in a seminar format. Course may be repeated for credit.

PHIL–P 334 Buddhist Philosophy (3 cr.)
P: ENG-W 131; 6 credit hours of philosophy; and senior standing. An examination of the basic philosophical concepts of early Buddhism and their subsequent development in India, Japan, and Tibet. Implications of the Buddhist view of reality for knowledge, the self, and ethical responsibility will be explored.

PHIL–P 335 Phenomenology and Existentialism (3 cr.)
P: ENG-W 131; 6 credit hours in philosophy. Selected readings from Buber, Camus, Heidegger, Husserl, Jaspers, Kierkegaard, Marcel, Nietzsche, and Sartre.

PHIL–P 336 Analytic Philosophy (3 cr.)
P: ENG-W 131; 6 credit hours in philosophy. Selected readings from Russell, Moore, Wittgenstein, Carnap, Ryle, and others. Topics include realism, logical atomism, logical positivism, and ordinary language philosophy.

PHIL–P 338 Philosophy, Technology, and Human Values (3 cr.)
P: ENG-W 131; 6 credit hours in philosophy. A philosophical study of the role of technology in modern society, including consideration of the relationships between technology and human values.

PHIL–P 340 Classics in Ethics (3 cr.)
P: ENG-W 131: 6 credit hours of philosophy. Readings from Plato and Aristotle to Kant, Mill, and Nietzsche. Topics include virtue and human nature, pleasure and the good, the role of reason in ethics, the objectivity of moral principles, and the relation of religion to ethics.

PHIL–P 342 Problems of Ethics (3 cr.)
P: ENG-W 131; 6 credit hours of philosophy. Concentration on a single problem or on several problems. Examples are bioethics, reason in ethics, and objectivity in ethics.

PHIL–P 343 Classics in Social and Political Philosophy (3 cr.)
P: ENG-W 131; 6 credit hours in philosophy. Readings from Plato and Aristotle to Hobbes, Locke, Hegel, and Marx. Topics include the ideal state, the nature and proper ends of the state, natural law and natural right, social contract theory, and the notion of community.

PHIL–P 345 Problems in Social and Political Philosophy (3 cr.)
P: ENG-W 131; 6 credit hours in philosophy. Intensive study of one or more problems such as civil disobedience, participatory democracy, conscience and authority, law and morality.

PHIL–P 346 Philosophy of Art (3 cr.)
P: ENG-W 131; 6 credit hours in philosophy. Classical and contemporary theories of art: investigation and analysis of art works, of the creative activities by which they are produced, and of what is involved in appreciating them.

PHIL–P 371 Philisophy of Religion (3 cr.)
P: ENG-W 131; 6 credit hours of Philosophy. Topics such as the nature of religion, religious experience, the status of claims of religious knowledge, the nature and existence of God.

PHIL–P 374 Early Chinese Philosophy (3 cr.)
P: ENG-W 131; 6 credits of philosophy. Origins of Chinese philosophical traditions in the classical schools of Confucianism, Taoism, Mohism, and Legalism. Explores contrasting agendas of early Chinese and Western traditions.

PHIL–P 401 History of Philosophy: Special Topics (3 cr.)
P: ENG-W 131; 6 credit hours in philosophy. Special topics, such as developing views on one or more of the following subjects: substance, nature, essence, dialectics. May be repeated once with different topic.

PHIL–P 410 Ancient Greek Philosophy (3 cr.)
P: ENG-W 131; 6 credit hours in philosophy. A study of the earliest period of Western philosophy, dealing with such figures as the pre-Socratics, Plato, and Aristotle.

PHIL–P 435 Contemporary Continental Philosophy (3 cr.)
P: ENG-W 131; 6 credits of philosophy. Study of the work of philosophers in contemporary continental philosophy, including figures such as Foucault, Derrida, Eco, and Habermas.

PHIL–P 490 Readings in Philosophy (1–3 cr.)
P: ENG-W 131; 9 credits of philosophy; and consent of instructor. Intensive study of selected authors, topics, and problems.

PHIL–P 495 Senior Proseminar in Philosophy (1–4 cr.)
P: ENG-W 131; 9 credit hours in Philosophy; and senior status. For philosophy majors in their senior year of study. The proseminar will concentrate of issue(s) and figure(s) selected by the student and faculty involved. The emphasis will be on the preparation, formal presentation and discussion of papers.

PHIL–X 303 Introduction to Philosophy of Science (3 cr.)
P: ENG-W 131; 6 credits in Philosophy. Scientific explanation, discovery, and theory testing. Do logic and mathematics have empirical content? Philosophical issues in the sciences: causality, space-time, free will, and science of human behavior.

 

Resident

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James Barry
Professor of Philosophy
jjbarry@ius.edu
Phone: (812) 941-2225
Office Location: KV 200 J
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Bryan Hall
Associate Professor of Philosophy
hallbw@ius.edu
Phone: (812) 941-2382
Office Location: KV 200 T
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George Harvey
Associate Professor of Philosophy
whgeorge@ius.edu
Phone: (812) 941-2110
Office Location: KV 200 H
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Leigh Viner
Senior Lecturer in Philosophy
Coordinator of Philosophy, Religious Studies, and Humanities
vviner@ius.edu
Phone: (812) 941-2109
Office Location: KV 200 G
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Adjunct

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Brian Barnes
Adjunct Lecturer, Philosophy
bgbarnes@ius.edu
Office Location: KV 110
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Norman Brian Cubbage
Adjunct Lecturer, Philosophy and Religious Studies
ncubbage@ius.edu
Office Location: KV 225
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Travis Derico
Adjunct Lecturer in Religion Studies
tmderico@ius.edu
Office Location: KV 110
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Mary Ann Edwardsen
Adjunct Lecturer, Philosophy and Religious Studies
maaedwar@ius.edu
Office Location: KV 110
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Michael Hagan
Adjunct Lecturer, Philosophy
michagan@ius.edu
Office Location: KV 110
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Rev. Thicht Hang-Dat
Adjunct Faculty
hthich@ius.edu
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Thomas V. Kennedy
Adjunct Lecturer, Philosophy
tvkenned@ius.edu
Office Location: KV 110
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Monica Krupinski
Adjunct Lecturer
monikrup@ius.edu
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Mark Kuhn
Adjunct Lecturer, Philosophy
markuhn@ius.edu
Office Location: KV 110
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Joshua Mills-Knutsen
Adjunct Lecturer
jmillskn@ius.edu
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Beth Rosdatter
Adjunct Lecturer
prosdatt@ius.edu
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George Shields
Adjunct Lecturer, Philosophy
geshield@ius.edu
Office Location: KV 110
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Robert S. Urekew
Adjunct Lecturer, Philosophy and Religious Studies
rurekew@ius.edu
Office Location: KV 110
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Emeritus

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William D. Rumsey
Professor Emeritus
wrumsey@ius.edu
Phone: (502) 895-8414
Office Location: 200J
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Guidelines for Writing Philosophy Papers

As we stress in our discussion of the goals of the IU Southeast philosophy program, philosophy aims to develop creative and independent thinking on a variety of complex and difficult problems. There are distinctive benefits to be gained from organizing one's thoughts on a specific problem clearly and carefully in a form in which they can be examined critically by others. So we place considerable emphasis upon the presentation of written material.

Essays and reports are thought of not merely as a means of mastering assigned material, although in a new subject there will necessarily be some element of this, but as an opportunity for reflection upon the questions raised by the subject matter of the course. Students are encouraged to think seriously about these questions, so that they may make their own contribution to the subject from the start.

Many students who are relatively unfamiliar with the study of philosophy have found, at least initially, that written assignments present certain difficulties. The notes that follow provide some guidance for those who may be uncertain as to what is expected of them. They should not be regarded as cannonical. They do not prescribe any one method of working on assignments as the correct one, nor are they intended to cramp individual style. Experienced students may prefer to disregard them entirely.

It is hoped, however, that most will find some of the suggestions helpful in improving their grasp of the discipline no less than in meeting the formal requirements of a course. They are based upon experience of what makes for fruitful discussion, and of the problems commonly encountered by those for whom philosophy in a new subject. They are offered with the special requirements of philosophy in view, although they have some application to academic reporting generally.

The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy contains entries on a wide variety of philosophical topics written by well-respected contemporary philosophers.

The IU Southeast Library System

The IU Southeast Library System has recently acquired a license for students and faculty to use "The Philosopher's Index". This is the main subject and author index to articles, anthologies, books, and reviews in the Philosophical world. In addition, the library has a subscription of the Oxford English Dictionary. Both are available through the link above.

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