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General Education Requirements Course List



Central Issues, Ideas, and Methods of Inquiry in Arts and Humanities

The Arts

FINA-F 100 Fundamental Studio - Drawing

A basic course for the development of visual awareness and coordination of perceptual and manual skills; seeing, representing, and inventing on an experimental, exploratory level on a two-dimensional surface. Problems in composition as well as hands-on work with the formal elements of art: line, shape, space, value, texture.

FINA-H 100 Art Appreciation

The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with outstanding works of art and provide an approach to appreciation through knowledge of purposes, techniques, forms, and content. Does not count toward the fine arts major.

FINA-N 110 Introduction to Studio Art

A general introduction to painting, drawing, printmaking, and ceramics for the non-major.

MUS-E 241 Introduction to Music Fundamentals

Basic music theory and beginning piano with an interdisciplinary focus. Fulfills arts requirement for special education and elementary education. Also for the non-major who wishes to learn the basics of music notation and theory.

MUS-M 174 Music for the Listener

An introduction to the art of music and its materials, to symphonic music, opera, and other types of classical music, and to the works of the great composers. For the non-major.

MUS-T 109 Rudiments of Music I

A music elective that covers learning to read music notation, scales, chords, rhythms and some keyboard. For the general student and for music majors needing a preparatory course before taking music theory (MUST-T 113).

THTR-T 105 Theatre Appreciation

Introduction to the art of the theatre through a study of major dramatic forms and theatrical techniques. No credit for theatre/drama major concentration.

THTR-T 120 Acting I

Introduction to theories, methodology, and skills: body movement, voice and diction, observation, concentration, imagination. Emphasis on improvisational exercises. Lectures and laboratory.

THTR-T 271 Intro to History of Theater II

Significant factors in primary periods of theatre history and their effect on contemporary theatre. Review of representative plays of each period to illustrate theatrical use of dramatic literature. Credit not given for both THTR-T 471 and THTR-T 271.

The Humanities

AFRO-A 169 Intro to African American Literature

Introduction to the African American literary tradition from the 1600s to the present.

ENG-L 101 Western World Masterpieces I

Literary masterpieces from Homer to present. Aims to teach thoughtful, intensive reading, to introduce aesthetic values in literature, and to bring about awareness of the enjoyment derived from reading.

ENG-L 102 Western World Masterpieces II

Literary masterpieces from Homer to present. Aims to teach thoughtful, intensive reading, to introduce aesthetic values in literature, and to bring about awareness of the enjoyment derived from reading.

ENG-L 104 Introduction to Fiction

Introduction to representative fiction and theories for interpreting fiction.

ENG-L 106 Introduction to Poetry

Representative poems in English; a course that enables students to read poetry with pleasure and to talk or write about it with ease.

FINA-A 101 Ancient & Medieval Art

A survey of major styles and monuments in art and architecture from prehistoric times to the end of the Middle Ages.

FINA-A 102 Renaissance through Modern Art

A survey of major artists, styles, and movements in European and American art and architecture from the fifteenth century to the present.

HUMA-U 101 Introduction to the Humanities

A survey of the development of the humanities to the Renaissance, with an emphasis on the relationship between ideas and the arts.

HUMA-U 102 Introduction to Modern Humanities

A survey of the development of the humanities from the Renaissance to the present, with an emphasis on the relationship of ideas and the arts.

PHIL-P 100 Introduction to Philosophy

Perennial problems of philosophy, including problems in ethics, in epistemology and metaphysics, and in philosophy of religion. Readings in selected writings of philosophers from Plato to the present.

PHIL-P 140 Introduction to Ethics

The study of classical ethics-texts by Aristotle, Kant, Mill, and many others. Examination of some contemporary moral issues.

Central Issues, Ideas, and Methods of Inquiry in Natural and Physical Sciences

BIOL-L 100 Humans and the Biological World -5 credit hours

Principles of biological organization, from molecules through cells and organisms to populations. Emphasis on processes common to all organisms, with special reference to human beings. This course will not count toward a biology degree. (Lab fee required.)

BIOL-L 101 Introduction to Biological Sciences - 5 credit hours

Lecture and laboratory. Fundamental principles of biology for students considering a biology major or students with high school science background. Principles of evolution, animal morphology, physiology and diversity, and ecology. (Lab fee required.)

BIOL-L 102 Introduction to Biological Sciences II- 5 credit hours

Fundamental principles of biology for students considering a biology major or students with high schools science background. Principles of evolution, systematics, diversity and ecology, and plant biology.

CHEM-C 101 Elementary Chemistry I - 3 credit hours

Introduction to chemistry. Usually taken concurrently with C 121. Lectures and discussion. The two sequences, C101-C121 and C102-C122, usually satisfy programs that require only two semesters of chemistry. Admission to advanced courses on the basis of C 101-C 121 and C102-C122 is granted only in exceptional cases. May be taken by students who have deficiencies in chemistry background in preparation for C105 without credit toward graduation. Credit given for only one of the following chemistry courses: C101, C104, C105.

CHEM-C 102 Elementary Chemistry II - 3 credit hours

Continuation of C101. Usually taken concurrently with C122. The chemistry of organic compounds and their reactions, followed by an extensive introduction to biochemistry. Lectures and discussion. Credit not given for both C102 and C341.

CHEM-C 104 Physical Sciences & Society - 5 credit hours

An integrated survey of modern applications and relationships of physical sciences to society developed from the basic concepts of motion, structure of matter, energy, reactions and the environment, and leading to considerations of specific problem areas such as pollution, drugs, energy alternatives, consumer products, and transportation. May be taken by

CHEM-C 105 Principles of Chemistry I - 3 credit hours

Should be taken concurrently with C125. Basic principles, including stoichiometry, equilibrium, atomic and molecular structures. Lectures and discussion. Credit given for only one of these chemistry courses: C101, C104, C105.

CHEM-C 121 Elementary Lab Chemistry I (Effective Date: Fall 2008) - 2 credit hours

An introduction to the techniques and reasoning of experimental chemistry. Credit not given for both C121 and C125. (Lab fee required.)

CHEM-C 122 Elementary Lab Chemistry II - 2 credit hours

Continuation of C121. Emphasis on organic and biochemical experimental techniques. Credit not given for both C122 and C343. (Lab fee required.)

CHEM-C 125 Experimental Chemistry I - 2 credit hours

An introduction to laboratory experimentation, with particular emphasis on the molecular interpretation of the results. Credit not given for both C125 and C121.

GEOG-G 107 Physical Systems of the Environment - 3 credit hours

An examinations of the physical environment as the home of human beings, with emphasis on the distribution and interaction of environmental variables and energy flow through the system. Take with GEOG-G 108 to meet 5 credit hours requirement.

GEOG-G 108 Physical Systems of the Environment Lab - 2 credit hours

Laboratory study of the physical environment. Corequisite of GEOG-G 107.

GEOL-G 100 Earth Science: Geologic Aspects - 5 credit hours

Broad study of the earth. The earth in the solar system, earth's atmosphere. Formation and modification of earth materials, landforms, continents, and oceans throughout geologic time. Geological records in selected areas. Lectures, laboratory, field trips. Credit given for only one of the following geology courses: G100, G103, or G110. (Lab fee required.)

PHYS-P 100 Physics in the Modern World - 5 credit hours

Ideas, language methods, impact, and cultural aspects of physics today. Four lectures and one two-hour laboratory period each week. Includes classical physics up to physical bases of radar, atomic-energy applications, etc. Beginning high school algebra used. Cannot be substituted for physics courses explicitly designated in specified curricula.

PHYS-P 201 General Physics I - 5 credit hours

Noncalculus presentation of Newtonian mechanics, wave motion, heat, thermodynamics, and properties of matter. Application of physical principles to related scientific disciplines, including engineering and life sciences. Four hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory work per week. (Lab fee required.)

PHYS-P 221 Physics I - 5 credit hours

Newtonian mechanics, oscillations and waves, heat and thermodynamics, and introduction to concepts of relativity. For physical science and engineering students. Four hours of lecture and two and one-half hours of laboratory per week. (Lab fee required.)

PLSC-B 101 Plant Biology- 5 credit hours

Fundamental principles of biology as illustrated by plants: characteristics of living matter, nutrition, growth, responses to environment, reproduction, basic principles of heredity.

The following courses are currently approved, but by themselves, will not meet the new requirements either because they do not have a lab component or because they require a content area prerequisite

AST-A 100 The Solar System - 3 credit hours

Celestial sphere and constellations, measurement of time, astronomical instruments, Earth as a planet, moons, eclipses, planets and their satellites, comets, meteors, theories or origin of solar system.

BIOL-L 100 Humans and the Biological World - 3 credit hours (5 hour version will meet requirement)

Principles of biological organization, from molecules through cells and organisms to populations. Emphasis on processes common to all organisms, with special reference to human beings. This course will not count toward a biology degree. (Lab fee required.)

CHEM-C 100 The World as Chemistry - 3 credit hours

The World of Chemistry is a general education course for non-science majors. It is designed to explore chemistry in the context of the real social, political, and environmental world around us. No previous chemistry experience is required.

Should be taken concurrently with C126. Chemical equilibria, structures, and properties of inorganic compounds. Lectures and discussion.

CHEM-C 126 Experimental Chemistry II - 2 credit hours

A continuation of C125, with emphasis on synthesis and analysis of compounds. (Lab fee required.)

GEOL-G 180 Dinosaurs - 3 credit hours

A survey of the characteristics and evolution of dinosaurs. Topics include: the occurrence of dinosaur remains in the fossil record, basic anatomy, principles used in classification, types of predatory and plant-eating dinosaurs, environments occupied during life, behavior, extinction theories, dinosaurs in the media and the public eye. (Credit not given for both GEOL

PHYS-P 105 Basic Physics of Sound - 3 credit hours

The physical principles involved in the description, generation, and reproduction of sound. Topics discussed include physics of vibrations and waves, Fourier decomposition of complex wave forms, harmonic spectra, propagations of sound waves in air, standing waves and resonance, sound loudness and decibels, room acoustics, and sound recording and reproduction, including digital sound. Intended for students majoring in the humanities, social sciences, business, music and education. Little or no background in science is assumed. Mathematics at the level of one year of high school algebra is used.

PHYS-P 120 Energy & Technology - 3 credit hours

Provides the physical basis for understanding interaction of technology and society, and for the solution of problems, such as energy use and the direction of technological change. Normally taught as a First Year Experience course (open only to students in their first year at IUS).

Central Issues, Ideas, and Methods of Inquiry in Social and Behavioral Sciences

ECON-E101 Survey of Economic Issues and Problems

For non-Business and non-Economics majors only. Basic economic principles applied to current social issues and problems. Topics covered will typically include inflation, unemployment, wage and price controls, welfare, social security, national debt, health programs, food prices, pollution, crime, mass transit, revenue sharing, multinationals, population, and energy. Not open to those with previous college-level economics.

ECON-E150 Introduction to Economics

First course in a two-semester sequence - with macroeconomics and microeconomics and an emphasis on intuition and concepts. Explains macroeconomic issues such as economic growth and government efforts to regulate the business cycle. Explains microeconomic concepts such as demand/supply and market structures. Will cover topics such as pollution, education, poverty, health, and international trade/finance.

GEOG-G 110 Introduction to Human Geography

An exploration of social and cultural phenomena as these are expressed and distributed across the earth's surface. Topics include population, migration, language, religion, customs, political divisions, agriculture, industry, and urbanization.

HIST-H 101 The World in the 20th Century

Survey of major global events and developments in the twentieth century: imperialism, World War I, Russian and Chinese revolutions, Great Depression, World War II, cold war, emergence of Third World, contemporary life.

HIST-H 103 Europe: Renaissance to Napoleon

Major developments in European thought during the Renaissance, the Reformation, the scientific revolution, and the Enlightenment; traditional politics, economy, and society and their transformation by enlightened despotism, the French Revolution, and Napoleon.

HIST-H 104 Europe: Napoleon to Present

The development of European society from the downfall of Napoleon in 1815 to the present. The impact of the industrial revolution; the rise of the middle class; liberalism, Marxism, and mass politics; nationalism and imperialism; international communism and fascism.

HIST-H 105 American History I

Europe and America before colonization; the colonial era and the contact of cultures; the Revolutionary Era; the Early Republic; the Antebellum Era and the Civil War

HIST-H 106 American History II

Combines social, cultural, economic and cultural approaches to explore Reconstruction and the New South; the Gilded Age and Progressive Era, WWI, the Depression, New Deal, and WWII; and America since 1945 (the Cold War and its end, progressive social movements, the New Right, etc

JOUR-C 200 Intro to Mass Communications

Survey of the functions, responsibilities, and influences of the various media of mass communication. Directed toward the consumer and critic of mass media.

POLS-Y 103 Introduction to American Politics

Introduction to the nature of government and the dynamics of American politics. Origin and nature of the American federal system, its political party base, public policy, and law. Required for majors.

POLS-Y 107 Introduction to the Comparative Politics

Explores similarities and differences between political institutions and processes in political systems around the world. Usually covers Britain, Germany, Russia, China, Mexico, Nigeria, and Egypt.

POLS-Y 109 Introduction to International Politics

Causes of war, nature and attributes of the state, imperialism, international law, national sovereignty, arbitration, adjudication, international organizations, major international issues.

POLS-Y 205 Elements of Political Analysis

An analysis of the major approaches to and techniques of the systematic study of political science. Professionally oriented. Required for majors.

PSY-B 310 Lifespan Development

This course emphasizes a life-span perspective of physical, motor, intellectual, cognitive, language, social, and personality development. Commonalities across the lifespan as well as differences among various segments of the lifespan are examined. Theory and research are equally stressed.

PSY-P 101 Introductory Psychology 1

Introduction to psychology; methods, data, and theoretical interpretation of psychology in the areas of learning, sensory psychology, and psychophysiology.

PSY-P 102 Introductory Psychology 2

Continuation of P101. Individual differences; personality; developmental, abnormal, and social psychology.

SOC-S 163 Social Problems

Major social problems in areas such as the family, religion, economic order; crime, mental disorders, civil rights; racial, ethnic, and international tensions. Relation to structure and values of larger society.

Information Literacy/FYS

COAS-S 104 Freshman Seminar in Social and Historical Studies

Introduction to college-level projects chosen from social and historical studies fields. Students will learn how scholars frame questions, propose answers, and asses the validity of competing approaches in a small-class experience with a faculty member. Writing and related skills are stressed. Topics will vary.

Reasoning about Ethical Questions or Diversity

AFRO-A 169 Introduction to Afro American Literature

Introduction to the African American literary tradition from the 1600s to the present. A survey and analysis of representative African American and African Diasporic writings (poetry, short story, sermons, novel, drama) with a view toward developing an appreciation for reading, the literary vocabulary, literary design, and the critical method.

AFRO-A 249 African American Autobiography

A survey of autobiographies written by black Americans in the last two centuries.

EDUC-M 300 Teaching in a Pluralistic Society

This course is designed to introduce students to teaching as a profession. Students focus upon the "self as teacher," learning styles, cultural pluralism, and classroom teaching strategies that respond positively to the personal and ethnic diversity of the learner.

FINA-A 150 African, New World and Oceanic Art

A survey of the arts and cultures of the native peoples of Africa, North and South America, and the South Pacific. (A150 and A458 may not both be taken for credit.)

GEOG-G 201 World Regional Geography

Geographical analysis of regions occupied by European cultures and of indigenous spatial developments in non-Western areas.

HIST-E 100 Issues in African History

Survey of selected issues and problems. Topics will vary from semester to semester, but will be broad subjects that cut across fields, regions, and periods.

HIST-F 100 Issues in Latin American History

The coming together of the three races in the New World; the construction of a social, political, and economic order; the resilience and/or fragility of the social, political, and economic order in modern times.

HIST-F 216 History of Slavery in the Americas

Slavery in the New World is explored by comparing its form and content in North America, the Caribbean, and South America. Special attention is paid to the mechanisms by which slaves were held in slavery and the adaptations and accommocations that were made by both masters and slaves.

HIST-F 232 Upheaval in 20th Century Latin America

An examination of major breaks in the continuities of Latin American history, revolutions both on the right and on the left, as well as the great popular uprising in Mexico with such folk heroes as Pancho Villa and Emiliano Zapata are associated.

HIST-G 100 Issues in Asian History

Study and analysis of selected historical issues and problems in Asian societies; especially important are their political institutions, economic development, ideological and religious foundations, and social changes.

HIST-H 207 Modern East-Asian Civilization

Focus on China, Japan, and Korea in the twentieth century. Explores both the history of each individual country and the experiences shared by all three. Traditional values challenged by modernism, interactions with the West, domestic strife.

HIST-H 231 Women, Men, and Family in History

The course will examine changes in relationships within the family and the changing role of the family in society. Changes in gender roles will be highlighted. Among the topics to be discussed are courtship, marriage, inheritance, child-bearing, child labor, the origins of family limitation and birth control, and the effects of other institutions on the family

HON-H 103 Honors Seminar: Common Intellectual Experience I

Admission to the Honors Program. A skills course emphasizing writing, reading, speaking, thinking skills, collaborative learning, diversity, research, and the use of technology in an academic setting. Readings and discussion of texts-in-common selected by Honors faculty and studied in preparation for possible project presentation at the Mid- East Honors Conference in the spring. Ordinarily taken during the first semester of study at IU Southeast. Part one of the required two-semester seminar sequence for Tier One students.

JOUR-J 280 Seminar in Journalism Ethics

Examines the ethical dilemmas that confront today's journalists and provides a framework for decision making.

PHIL-P 100 Introduction to Philosophy

Perennial problems of philosophy, including problems in ethics, in epistemology and metaphysics, and in philosophy of religion. Readings in selected writings of philosophers from Plato to the present.

PHIL-P 140 Introduction to Ethics

The study of classical ethics-texts by Aristotle, Kant, Mill, and many others. Examination of some contemporary moral issues.

PHIL-P 145 Intro to Social & Political Philosophy

Fundamental problems of social and political philosophy: the nature of the state, political obligation, freedom and liberty, equality, justice, rights, social change, revolution, and community. Readings from classical and contemporary sources.

PHIL-P 170 Introduction to Asian Philosophy

Survey of select philosophical traditions of India, China, and Japan, including Vedanta, Mahayana Buddhism, Confucianism, and Taoism. Topics include the nature of reality, ethical responsibility, and the role of the "self" in creating ignorance and attaining enlightenment.

PHIL-P 200 Problems of Philosophy

Selected writings of modern philosophers concerning some important philosophical problems.

PHIL-P 240 Business & Morality

Fundamental issues of moral philosophy in a business context. Application of moral theory to issues such as the ethics of investment, moral assessment of corporations, and duties of vocation.

POLS-Y 107 Intro to Comparative Politics

Explores similarities and differences between political institutions and processes in political systems around the world. Usually covers Britain, Germany, Russia, China, Mexico, Nigeria, and Egypt.

POLS-Y 109 Intro to International Relations

Causes of war, nature and attributes of the state, imperialism, international law, national sovereignty, arbitration, adjudication, international organizations, major international issues.

SOC-S 163 Social Problems

Major social problems in areas such as the family, religion, economic order; crime, mental disorders, civil rights; racial, ethnic, and international tensions. Relation to structure and values of larger society.

SPCH-S 122 Interpersonal Communication

Practical consideration of spontaneous human interaction in face-to-face situations. Special attention is given to perception, language, and attitudes in dyads and small groups.

Oral Communication

SPCH-S 121 Public Speaking

Theory and practice of public speaking, training in thought processes necessary to organize speech content, analysis of components of effective delivery and language.

HON-H 104 Honors Seminar: Common Intellectual Experience II

Admission to the Honors Program. Continuation of H 103. Builds on skills attained in the first semester with continued reading and discussion of texts-in-common. Students will begin to envision, research, and refine projects for possible presentation at the Mid-East Honors Conference in the spring. Ordinarily taken during the second semester of study at IU Southeast. Part two of the required two-semester seminar sequence for Tier One students.

Quantitative Reasoning

MATH-A 118 Finite Mathematics for the Social & Biological Sciences

Quantitative reasoning, probability, elementary combinations, reading and interpreting graphs and tables, measuring central tendency and variation, scatter plots, correlation, regression. Intended to meet the finite math requirement for students who will be taking K300. Course uses applied examples from psychology, sociology, biology, and political science.

MATH-M 110 Excursions in Mathematics

A course designed to convey the flavor and spirit of mathematics, stressing reasoning and comprehension rather than technique. Not preparatory to other courses; mathematical topics may vary. This course does not count toward a major in mathematics.

MATH-M 114 Quantitative Literacy II

Quantitative reasoning, probability, reading and interpreting graphs and tables, measuring central tendency and variation.

MATH-M 117 Intermediate Algebra (For continuing students only. Last offer Spring 2013.)

Factoring, rational expressions, fractional exponents, radicals, quadratic equations, linear and quadratic functions, and linear systems. Does not satisfy arts and sciences distribution requirement. Credit by examination not given.

MATH-M 118 Finite Mathematics

Set theory,linear systems,matrices and determinants,probability,statistics and finance.Applications to problems from the social sciences.

MATH-M 119 Brief Survey of Calculus I

Introduction to calculus. Primarily for students in business and the social sciences. Not open to those who have had M215. For additional restrictions refer to M215-M216.

MATH-M 122 College Algebra

Designed to prepare students for M119 (calculus). Includes graphing linear and nonlinear functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, linear and nonlinear equations and inequalities. A student taking both M122 and M125 will receive only 3 credit hours toward graduation.

MATH-M 125 Precalculus Mathematics

Designed to prepare students for M215 (Calculus). Algebraic operations, polynomials, functions and their graphs, conic sections, linear systems of equations, exponential and logarithmic functions. A student taking both M122 and M125 will receive only 3 credit hours toward graduation.

MATH-M 215 Calculus I

Coordinates, functions, straight line, limits, continuity, derivative and definite integral, applications, circles, conics, techniques of integration, infinite series. A student who has had M119 will receive 3 credits toward graduation for M215 and 5 credits for M216.

MATH-T 101 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I

Problem solving with and operations on whole numbers and integers. Prime numbers and elementary number theory. Other bases and exponents. Elements of set theory and functions. Equations and inequalities over the real number system. Open only to elementary-education students.

Written Communication

Basic Requirement

ENG-W 131 Elementary Composition I

Engagement with the writing process, from brainstorming to drafting to peer editing to proofreading. Focuses on language use, strategies of organization, handling of primary and secondary evidence (a short research essay is required).

HON-H 103 Honors Seminar: Common Intellectual Experience I

Admission to the Honors Program. A skills course emphasizing writing, reading, speaking, thinking skills, collaborative learning, diversity, research, and the use of technology in an academic setting. Readings and discussion of texts-in-common selected by Honors faculty and studied in preparation for possible project presentation at the Mid- East Honors Conference in the spring. Ordinarily taken during the first semester of study at IU Southeast. Part one of the required two-semester seminar sequence for Tier One students.

Second-Level Approved Courses

ENG-W 231 Professional Writing Skills

To develop writing skills requisite for most professional activities. Emphasis on methods of research, organization, and writing techniques useful in preparing business and professional memos, letters, reports, and proposals. This course does not count toward the humanities distribution requirement for B.A. candidates.

ENG-W 234 Technical Report Writing

Instruction in preparing engineering and other technical proposals and reports, with an introduction to the use of graphics.

ENG-W250 Writing in Context

A course designed to provide a subject-matter context for reading, writing, and research assignments of increasing complexity. Topics of general interest (e.g., autobiography, nature writing, science and society, teacher and child, American business, prison life, etc.) vary from section to section.

ENG-W 270 Argumentative Writing

Offers instruction and practice in writing argumentative essays about complicated and controversial issues. The course focuses on strategies for identifying issues, assessing claims, locating evidence, deciding on a position, and writing papers with clear assertion and convincing arguments.

ENG-W 290 Writing in the Arts & Sciences

An introduction to academic writing as a means of discovery and record. Study of and practice in the procedures, conventions, and terminology of the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences. Research-intensive.

ENG-W 300 Writing for Teachers

The study of writing in relation to the teaching of writing in the schools. Students will evaluate their own writing strengths and weakness and complete a series of writing assignments meant to improve their writing skills. Additionally, students will read current, selected works in composition theory and learn how to apply their new understandings about writing to

ENG-W 310 Language and the Study of Writing

Designed as an introduction to the logical foundation and rhetorical framework of effective writing.

ENG-W 315 Writing for the Web

This course introduces students to new forms of writing (beyond word processing and desktop publishing) made possible by computers - hypertext, electronic mail, and computer conferencing - and explores what impact these new forms will have on literacy skills for writers and readers of such computer-delivered texts.

ENG-W 350 Advanced Expository Writing

Close examination of assumptions, choices, and techniques which go into a student’s own writing and the writing of others.

ENG-W 420 Argumentative Writing

Presents argument as a process of inquiry. Applies critical and creative thinking to analyzing and composing effective argument. Addresses contexts and ideologies as a component of audience receptivity to ideas. Writers form and test ideas from pluralistic perspectives on controversial issues about which reasonable people disagree, including culturesensitive