Why Study Psychology at IU Southeast?

Have you wondered why people do the things they do? Have you ever wished you could help people experiencing emotional pain? Then maybe you should consider a psychology major.

Why Study Image

Psychological disorders, dreams, attachment in children, genetic influences on intelligence, shyness, eyewitness testimony, neuroscience, sensation & perception - these are just a few of the numerous topics covered in psychology. Although you may find many definitions, psychology is commonly defined as the scientific study of behavior and mental processes.

What is Psychology?

Becoming a psychologist means using scientific methods to understand behavior. Psychology is a diverse field with both scientific and professional aspects. As a science, psychology focuses on research: psychologists collect, quantify, analyze and interpret data describing human and animal behavior. As a profession, psychology focuses on the application of knowledge, skills and techniques to solve individual and social problems.

BA (Bachelor of Arts) vs BS (Bachelor of Science)

Whether you choose the BA or BS degree will be dependent upon your career goal. Both the BA and the BS degree prepare you for all areas (clinical, developmental, etc.) of graduate level study in psychology and similar employment opportunities. Which degree is best for you depends upon the graduate program to which you are applying. The BS degree program prepares you for graduate programs which require you to have completed more math and science undergraduate courses. The BS degree may also be of more interest to employers such as laboratories, pharmaceutical companies and human factor labs.

The check sheets in the Social Science office provides a comparison of the courses required for the BA and the BS degree:

BA BS
Some course requirement differences:  
Foreign Language More science courses
Math M118 Math M122
History courses  
Educational opportunities:  
Masters in Social Work Masters in Social Work
Masters in Counseling Masters in Counseling
PsyD PsyD
  Medical School
  Neuroscience
   

Whether the BA or BS is appropriate depends upon the program to which you apply (Start planning for about graduate school early)

Please contact a Psychology faculty member in your area of interest to discuss your career goals and degree options. Contact information may be obtained or appointments made through the School of Social Sciences Office, CV 140, (812) 941-2391.

Sample Four Year Plans

View a sample four year degree plan for a Bachelor of Art in Psychology.

View a sample four year degree plan for a Bachelor of Science in Psychology.

Requirements for Bachelor of Arts Degree

34 credit hours in Psychology, including:

Required Courses: P101, P102, P199, P250, P251, and B452

  • Choose ONE from the following group: P325, P326, P329, P335
  • Choose ONE from the following group: B310, P319, P320, B354
  • Choose ONE from the following group: B366, B378, B386, P324, P336, P430

9 hours of psychology electives.

  • Note that only 6 hours (2 courses) from B309, P493, P494, and P495 may be used for completing the requirements for the psychology major.

Total psychology hours credits = 34

Requirements for a Bachelor of Science Degree

Required Courses: P101, P102, P199, P250, P251, B452, and either P493, P495 or P454.

  • Choose THREE from the following group: P325, P326, P329, P335
  • Choose ONE from the following group: B310, P319, P320, B354
  • Choose ONE from the following group: B366, B378, B386, P324, P336, P430

6 hours of psychology electives.

  • Note that only 6 hours (2 courses) from B309, P493, P494, and P495 may be used for completing the requirements for the psychology major.

Total psychology hours credits = 40

Requirements for a Minor in Psychology

18 credit hours, including:

  • P101 Introductory Psychology I
  • P102 Introductory Psychology II
  • Group I: Choose ONE from the following
    • P325 Psychology of Learning
    • P326 Behavioral Neuroscience
    • P329 Sensation and Perception
    • P335 Cognitive Psychology
  • Group II: Choose ONE from the following
    • B310 Life-Span Development
    • P319 Psychology of Personality
    • P320 Social Psychology
    • B354
  • Group III: Choose ONE from the following
    • B378
    • P324
    • P326
    • P430
  • Electives in psychology to total 18 credit hours

Recommended Courses

Especially useful for psychology majors are courses in mathematics, chemistry, physics, biology, communications, and writing. No minor is required, but majors should consider course work in other social sciences such as anthropology, sociology, and political science, as well as philosophy.

Please contact any Psychology faculty member or Dana Gohmann or Misti Whitaker to make an appointment for advising, which should be done regularly for practicum, research and graduate school information.

Dana Gohmann
Academic Advisor
School of Social Sciences
Phone: (812) 941-2391
Office: Crestview 137
Email: dgohmann@ius.edu

Misti Whitaker
Academic Advisor
School of Social Sciences
Phone:(812) 941-2391
Office: Crestview 135
Email: mdwhitak@ius.edu

Please call the main Social Sciences office at(812) 941-2391 for an appointment.

Advising information for Research Opportunities

Essentially, psychologists are talking about "research" when we plan a way to answer a particular question. In psychology we may be involved in several types of research involving questionnaires, interviews, or experimental equipment. While research can be conducted with either humans or animals, most of the research currently being conducted in the Psychology Department involves humans.

Read more about Research Opportunities »

Advising information for Practicum Opportunities

A practicum or internship is a supervised work experience in your major area. For example, a psychology student may have a practicum at a shelter for the homeless.

Read more about Practicum Opportunities »

Advising information for Getting into Graduate School

Getting into graduate school is a lengthy process that the student should begin to think about as early as possible. There are numerous types of graduate programs available. Each of these programs demand different requirements for potential students. The information here is meant to guide you into thinking about the steps necessary to get into a graduate program. The best advice you can receive is from your academic advisor. As soon as you become aware that you are considering the possibility of graduate school, schedule an appointment with your academic advisor.

Read more about Getting into Graduate School »

Psychology

PSY-P 101 Introduction to Psychology 1 (3 cr.)
Introduction to research methods, data, and theoretical interpretation of psychology in the areas of learning, sensation and perception, and behavioral neuroscience.

PSY-P 102 Introduction to Psychology 2 (3 cr.)
Introduction to individual differences; personality; and developmental, abnormal, and social psychology.

Psychology Advanced

PSY-B 310 Life-Span Development (3 cr.)
P: 3 credit hours in psychology. This course emphasizes a lifespan perspective of physical, motor, intellectual, cognitive, language, social, and personality development. Commonalities across the life span as well as differences among various segments of the life span are examined. Theory and research are equally stressed.

PSY-B 325 Psychology of Learning (3 cr.)
P: 6 credit hours in psychology. Facts and principles of human and animal learning, especially as treated in theories that provide a general framework for understanding what learning is and how it takes place.

PSY-B 354 Adult Development and Aging (3 cr.)
P: PSY-B 310 or consent of instructor. The course content examines changes that occur with age in the following areas: intelligence, memory, personality, sexuality, health, living environments, economics, developmental disorders, and treatment for developmental disorders.

PSY-B 366 Concepts and Applications of Organizational Psychology (3 cr.)
P: 3 credit hours in psychology or consent of instructor. The study and application of psychological principles to understand human behavior in the work setting. Emphasis on the role of psychological theory and research methodology in solving human behavior problems in the workplace. Specific areas of coverage include work motivation, job satisfaction, employee involvement, communication, leadership, team effectiveness, work and well-being, organizational structure and culture.

PSY-B 378 Introduction to Industrial Psychology (3 cr.)
P: 3 credit hours in psychology or consent of instructor. The design and application of psychological analysis and research methods to address personnel issues including recruitment, selection, placement, training and development, compensation, evaluation, and safety. Emphasis on interviewing skills, research methods, performance analysis and improvement, ergonomic solutions, and legal issues.

PSY-B 386 Introduction to Counseling (3 cr.)
P: PSY-P 324 The course is a general overview of the challenges therapists experience in the psychotherapeutic process from first session to termination. Students should gain an understanding of the therapeutic skills clinicians need, understand potential issues and pitfalls, and develop a cohesive understanding of the content of therapy.

PSY-B 388 Human Sexuality (3 cr.)
P: PSY-P 101 and PSY-P 102. This course presents a biopsychosocial model of sexual function and dysfunction. Factors influencing sexual functioning such as chronic illness, substance abuse, and fear of AIDS are explored. Sexual paraphilias will also be discussed.

PSY-B 452 Senior Seminar in Psychology (1-3 cr.)
P: Senior status, completion of PSY-P 250/P 251, and consent of instructor. A capstone course requiring readings, discussion, and typically, a research project. Repeatable for credit up to 12 units, provided different topics are studied.

PSY-P 199 Planning Your Psychology Career (1 cr.)
P: PSY-P 101, PSY-P 102. C: PSY-P 102. Intended for Psychology majors only. Where do you want to be 10 years from now? How can you get there? Information for undergraduate majors to help them intelligently organize their undergraduate studies. Information about what psychologists do, professional and practical issues in career choice, course selection, intern/research experience, and planning a course of study.

PSY-P 220 Introduction to Drugs and Behavior (3 cr.)
Introductory discussion of basic human neuroanatomy and the influence of drugs on the brain and behavior. The study of social and clinical aspects of drug use is covered.

PSY-P 234 Principles of Mental Health (3 cr.)
P: 3 credit hours of psychology. Development and maintenance of mental health by application of psychological and psychiatric principles of normal human behavior.

PSY-P 250 Research Methods & Statistics I (3 cr.)
P: PSY-P 101 and PSY-P 102; and MATH-M 118 or MATH-A 118 or above. Course is designed to enable students to become both a user and an informed consumer of basic statistical techniques used in psychological research. Students will also learn to design and critique the methodology of psychological research. Preparation of research proposals/reports using statistical analysis and knowledge of research methods is required. This course is the first semester of a two-semester course and must be taken the semester before taking P 251. Should be taken prior to enrolling in 300- and 400-level psychology courses.

PSY-P 251 Research and Quantitative Methods in Psychology II (3 cr.)
P: PSY-P 250. Course is a continuation of P 250 that includes statistical analysis, research methods, and proposal/report writing used in psychological research. This course is the second half of a two-semester course and must be taken the semester after P 250. Should be taken before enrolling in 300- and 400-level psychology courses.

PSY-P 301 Psychology and Human Problems (3 cr.)
P: Junior standing. Contemporary human problems considered from a psychological perspective. Representative topics include stress, creativity, environmental impact, behavior control, volunteerism, and drug usage.

PSY-P 303 Health Psychology (3 cr.)
P: 6 credit hours in psychology. Introductory course outlining contributions of psychology to the promotion and maintenance of health and prevention and treatment of illness. Special emphasis on clinical techniques used by psychologists to confront heart disease, cancer, and AIDS.

PSY-P 316 Psychology of Childhood and Adolescence (3 cr.)
P: PSY-B 310 or consent of instructor. Development of behavior in infancy, childhood, and youth; factors that influence behavior.

PSY-P 319 Psychology of Personality (3 cr.)
P: 6 credit hours in psychology. R: PSY-P 102. Methods and results of scientific study of personality. Basic concepts of personality traits and their measurement; developmental influences; problems of integration.

PSY-P 320 Social Psychology (3 cr.)
P: PSY-P 101 and PSY-P 102. Principles of scientific psychology applied to the individual in a social situation.

PSY-P 321 Group Dynamics (3 cr.)
P: 6 credit hours in psychology. Exposes the student to interpersonal processes inherent in group settings. Topics may include group psychotherapy, social factors in groups, group decision making or group violence. Particular focus of course may vary with instructor.

PSY-P 322 Psychology in the Courtroom (3 cr.)
P: PSY-P 101 and PSY-P 102; or consent of instructor. This course considers the psychological aspects of roles and interactions in the courtroom. Topics include definitions of “sanity” and “competency,” eyewitness testimony, jury selection, psychological autopsies, and the psychologist as “expert witness.”

PSY-P 324 Abnormal Psychology (3 cr.)
P: 6 credit hours in psychology. R: PSY-P 102. A first course in adult abnormal psychology; including forms of abnormal behavior, etiology, development, interpretations, and final manifestations.

PSY-P 326 Behavioral Neuroscience (3 cr.)
P: 6 credit hours in Psychology. R: BIOL-L 100 or BIOL-L 105 or AHLT-M 195. An examination of the cellular bases of behavior, emphasizing contemporary views and approaches to the study of the nervous system. Neural structure, function, and organization are considered in relation to sensory and motor function, motivation, learning, and other basic behaviors.

PSY-P 327 Psychology of Motivation (3 cr.)
P: 6 credit hours in psychology. How needs, desires, and incentives influence behavior; research on motivational processes in human and animal behavior, including ways in which motives change and develop.

PSY-P 329 Sensation and Perception (3 cr.)
P: 6 credit hours in psychology. R: AHLT-M 195. This course focuses on the study of vision, hearing, smell, taste, touch, temperature, and pain; as well as topics fundamental to an understanding of sensory and perceptual processes.

PSY-P 335 Cognitive Psychology (3 cr.)
P: 6 credit hours in psychology. Introduction to human cognitive processes, including attention and perception, memory, psycholinguistics, problem solving, and thinking.

PSY-P 336 Psychological Tests and Individual Differences (3 cr.)
P: MATH-K 300, or PSY-P 250/P 251. Principles of psychological testing. Representative tests and their uses for evaluation and prediction. Emphasis on concepts of reliability, validity, standardization, norms, and item analysis.

PSY-P 354 Statistical Analysis in Psychology (3 cr.)
P: PSY-P 101, PSY-P 102, and either MATH-K 300 or PSY-P 250/P 251. Use of statistics in psychological work, including multivariate statistical methods. Understanding of statistics as they are presented in the psychological literature. Use of computer statistical software package to analyze psychological data.

PSY-P 380 Ethical Issues in Psychology (3 cr.)
P: 6 credit hours in psychology. This course introduces students to methods of ethical reasoning, as well as ethical principles and laws that arise in the practice of psychology in academic, research, and clinical settings.

PSY-P 407 Drugs and the Nervous System (3 cr.)
P: 6 credit hours in psychology. Introduction to the major psychoactive drugs and how they act upon the brain to influence behavior. Discussion of the role of drugs as therapeutic agents for various clinical disorders and as probes to provide insight into brain function.

PSY-P 408 Brain and Cognition (3 cr.)
P: PSY-P 326. Discussion of the brain systems involved in cognition and perception. Emphasis upon understanding the anatomy and function of cerebral cortex. Consideration of neural models of brain function.

PSY-P 411 Neural Bases of Learning and Memory (3 cr.)
This course will survey the major work in the field of the neurobiology of memory, approaching the subject from anatomical, physiological, and neurochemical perspectives. Topics covered will include animal models of memory that have proven useful in this research, as well as what has been learned from humans with brain damage and from brain-imaging studies. The facts and fiction of memory-enhancing drugs will also be discussed.

PSY-P 417 Animal Behavior (3 cr.)
P: PSY-P 102. Methods, findings, and interpretations of recent investigations of animal behavior, including ethological studies.

PSY-P 418 Behavior Genetics (3 cr.)
P: PSY-P 101 and PSY-P 102; or consent of the instructor. Broad overview of the application of genetic methods to the study of human behavior. Emphasis is placed upon the use of family, twin, and adoption studies to address psychologically relevant questions concerning the nature and etiology of individual differences in behavior. No prior knowledge of genetics is assumed.

PSY-P 425 Behavioral Disorders of Childhood and Adolescence (3 cr.)
P: PSY-P 324. A survey of major behavior disorders, with emphasis on empirical research and clinical description relative to etiology, assessment, prognosis, and treatment.

PSY-P 430 Behavior Modification (3 cr.)
P: Junior standing and 9 credit hours in psychology. Principles, techniques, and applications of behavior modification, including reinforcement, aversive conditioning, observational learning, desensitization, self-control, and modification of cognitions.

PSY-P 438 Language and Cognition (3 cr.)
P: PSY-P 335. This course surveys the major themes that characterize psycholinguistics. Emphasizes the mental processes that underlie ordinary language use, the tacit knowledge that native English speakers have of their language, and the processes by which children acquire language.

PSY-P 440 Topics in Cognitive Psychology (3 cr.)
P: PSY-P 335. Seminar courses in current areas of research in cognitive psychology. Specific topic determined by instructor offering the course.

PSY-P 442 Infant Development (3 cr.)
P: PSY-B 310 or consent of intructor. Surveys cognitive, socioemotional, and perceptual-motor development during the first two years of life. Emphasis is on theory and research addressing fundamental questions about the developmental process, especially the biological bases for developmental change.

PSY-P 457 Topics in Psychology (1-3 cr.)
P: Junior or senior standing or consent of instructor. Studies in special topics not usually covered in other department courses. Topics vary with instructor and semester. Repeatable for credit up to 6 units, if topics differ.

PSY-P 459 History and Systems of Psychology (3 cr.)
P: PSY-P 101 and PSY-P 102; and 6 additional credit hours in psychology. Historical background and critical evaluation of major theoretical systems of modern psychology: structuralism, functionalism, associationism, behaviorism, Gestalt psychology, and psychoanalysis. Methodological problems of theory construction and system making. Emphasizes integration of recent trends.

PSY-P 460 Women: A Psychological Perspective (3 cr.)
P: 9 credit hours in psychology. Basic data and theories about the development and maintenance of sex differences in behavior and personality.

PSY-P 493 Supervised Research I (2-3 cr.)
P: PSY-P 101 and PSY-P 102, PSY-P 250 and PSY-P 251. Active participation in research. An independent experiment of modest magnitude, or participation in ongoing research in a single laboratory. Repeatable for credit up to 6 units.

PSY-P 494 Supervised Research II (3 cr.)
P: PSY-P 493. A continuation of PSY-P 493. Course will include a journal report of the two semesters of work. Repeatable for credit up to 6 units.

PSY-P 495 Readings and Research in Psychology (1-3 cr.)
P: Written consent of instructor, junior or senior standing. S/F grading. Repeatable for credit up to 9 units.

For many students, graduate school is not a part of their plans. Many students want to begin working after they receive their bachelor's degree. Unfortunately, you may have been told "You'll never get a job with a B.A. in Psychology!"

Do B.A.'s in Psychology get jobs after graduation?

Psychology is one of the most popular majors with college students both at IU Southeast and across the country. While many of these students do go on to some type of graduate training program, the majority does not. The remaining students DO get jobs!

What types of jobs are available to psychology majors?

Just about any entry-level position in the mental health field, business, or banking is available. The key to getting a job is to be competent in those skills employers are seeking.

To give you some idea of the type of jobs past psychology majors at IU Southeast have obtained a partial listing is provided. Do not feel constrained by this list as many students have been able to essentially create their own jobs.

  • Caseworker for Debra Corn agency
  • Counselor Lifespring
  • Counselor Jefferson Hospital
  • Personnel director for a hospital
  • Psychological testing for private practice psychologist
  • Social worker
  • Working at sleep lab at local hospital
  • Manager local store
  • Police officer
  • Assistant to local attorney
  • Research assistant to professors at local university

Can I do private practice with a B.A. degree?

While anyone can legally hang up their shingle and provide "counseling" for a fee, an individual with a B.A. degree in psychology cannot call themselves a psychologist or be reimbursed by insurance. In addition, your B.A. degree does not really prepare you for providing psychological testing or therapy. However, many students with a B.A. degree do work under an individual with graduate training in a supervisory relationship at community mental health centers and private hospitals.

What do employers want?

While employers differ, many employers report that they are looking for certain qualities in applicants for entry-level positions.

  • First, they want applicants who can communicate effectively both orally and in a written manner.
  • They also want applicants who can think clearly and apply whatever knowledge they have gained to real-life situations.
  • In addition, they want individuals who can get along with fellow employees, administrators, and customers.

As you can see, most entry-level positions in these fields do not require substantial specialized knowledge. Most employers expect and wish to train their employees according to their own procedures. Employers do expect the skills listed above and RELEVANT job experience. As a psychology major you have already acquired the skills as part of your class requirement.

How can I get RELEVANT job experience?

Many students at IU Southeast work full-time while attending classes. However, these jobs are rarely the type of job the student wishes to pursue after graduation. Psychology students are fortunate in that they have two means of acquiring work experience while earning college credit. Students can participate in research and practicum experiences. Suffice it to say that students are able to acquire the necessary work experience, skills, and recommendations from these experiences to give them the added advantage in later job interviews. In addition, many students have been offered jobs in placement sites at the end of their practicum.

What else can I do?

At IU Southeast, students are fortunate to have an active placement office here on campus. During your junior year, it is wise to make an appointment with a counselor in that office to discuss career-seeking strategies. The placement office can help you prepare a professional resume, hone your interviewing skills, and even help schedule interviews. The personnel in the placement office are trained professionals and will be able to help you present yourself in the best possible light to employers and to help you find those employers. By contacting the placement office during your junior year, you will have time to correct any deficiencies in your skills prior to graduation.

 

Resident

Faculty Bio Thumbnail
Bernardo J. Carducci
Professor of Psychology
Director of the Shyness Research Institute
bcarducc@ius.edu
Phone: (812) 941-2295
Office Location: CV 016
View Bio
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Donna Dahlgren
Professor of Psychology
First Year Seminar Director
ddahlgre@ius.edu
Phone: (812) 941-2682
Office Location: CV 032
View Bio
Faculty Bio Thumbnail
Deborah Finkel
Professor of Psychology
Director, Graduate Liberal Studies Programs
Dean of Research
dfinkel@ius.edu
Phone: (812) 941-2668
Office Location: CV 019
View Bio
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Meghan Kahn
Assistant Professor of Psychology
mckahn@ius.edu
Phone: (812) 941-2174
Office Location: CV 011
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Todd Manson
Assistant Professor of Psychology
tmanson@ius.edu
Phone: (812) 941-2861
Office Location: CV 024
View Bio
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Robin K. Morgan
Professor of Psychology
Associate Director, Project Syllabus
University Director, Faculty Colloquium on Excellence in Teaching (FACET)
rmorgan@ius.edu
Phone: (812) 941-2298
Office Location: CV 127
View Bio
Faculty Bio Thumbnail
ValĂ©rie B. Scott
Senior Lecturer (Psychology)
International Programs Co-Director
vbscott@ius.edu
Phone: (812) 941-2502
Office Location: CV 007
View Bio
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Diane  E. Wille
Professor of Psychology
Coordinator of Psychology
dwille@ius.edu
Phone: (812) 941-2300
Office Location: CV 015
View Bio
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Lucinda Woodward
Assistant Professor
Director of International Programs
Luwoodwa@ius.edu
Phone: (812) 941-2365
Office Location: CV 014
View Bio

Visiting

Faculty Bio Thumbnail
Robert Lipinski
Visiting Assistant Professor of Psychology
ralipins@ius.edu
Phone: (812) 941-2511
Office Location: CV 018A
View Bio
Faculty Bio Thumbnail
Ashley Ramsey
ashkrams@ius.edu
Phone: (812) 941-2863
Office Location: CV 022
View Bio
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Rodney Roosevelt
rwroosev@ius.edu
Phone: (812) 941-2890
Office Location: CV 034
View Bio

Adjunct

Faculty Bio Thumbnail
Terry Burger
tburger@ius.edu
Phone: (812) 941-2391
Office Location: CV 140
View Bio
Faculty Bio Thumbnail
Michael A. Day
Personal Counselor
micday@ius.edu
Phone: (812) 941-2244
Office Location: US 201
View Bio
Faculty Bio Thumbnail
Linda Greenwell
lbgreenwell@ius.edu
Phone: (812) 941-2391
Office Location: CV 140
View Bio
Faculty Bio Thumbnail
Liz Heiney
lheiney@ius.edu
Phone: (812) 941-2391
Office Location: CV 140
View Bio
Faculty Bio Thumbnail
Kimberly Laffollette
kms3@ius.edu
Phone: (812) 941-2391
Office Location: CV 140
View Bio
Faculty Bio Thumbnail
Amy Lindsey
ajlindse@ius.edu
Phone: (812) 941-2391
Office Location: CV 140
View Bio
Faculty Bio Thumbnail
Lindse Mitchell-Hurd
lrmitche@ius.edu
Phone: (812) 941-2391
Office Location: CV 140
View Bio
Faculty Bio Thumbnail
Carissa Shafto
cshafto@iupui.edu
Phone: (812) 941-2391
Office Location: CV 140
View Bio
Faculty Bio Thumbnail
Leasa Shake Tucker
ltucker@ius.edu
Phone: (812) 941-2391
Office Location: CV 140
View Bio
Faculty Bio Thumbnail
Anne Brandon Wood
anbwood@ius.edu
Phone: (812) 941-2391
Office Location: CV 140
View Bio

Getting into graduate school is a lengthy process that the student should begin to think about as early as possible. There are numerous types of graduate programs available. Each of these programs demand different requirements for potential students. The information here is meant to guide you into thinking about the steps necessary to get into a graduate program. The best advice you can receive is from your academic advisor. As soon as you become aware that you are considering the possibility of graduate school, schedule an appointment with your academic advisor.

SOCIAL SCIENCES CONTACT INFORMATION