Why Study Sociology at IU Southeast?

Sociology is the scientific study of human social relationships with a focus on the causes and consequences of human group behavior. Sociology students have access to a variety of resources at Indiana University Southeast. We take great pride in the human resources we offer.

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What is Sociology?


Sociology is the scientific study of human social relationships with a focus on the causes and consequences of human group behavior. Sociologists are concerned with the divisions of society regarding culturally shared and learned beliefs and behavior patterns. Sociology involves the gathering of information about society that is used to make generalizations and predictions about causes and consequences of social behavior.

Sociology majors must complete a minimum of thirty credit hours in sociology, in addition to general education requirements in science, language and humanities. Typically, the course of study includes an introductory course followed by courses in research methods and statistics, social psychology, sociological theory, and a senior seminar which serves as our capstone course.

Students select their advanced courses from a broad range of topic offerings including juvenile delinquency, the family, medical sociology, race and ethnic relations, human sexuality, aging and religion.

Facilities/Resources

Sociology students have access to a variety of resources at Indiana University Southeast. We take great pride in the human resources we offer. In addition to the close mentoring relationship developed between the faculty and the student, a close relationship with the community is fostered. This is accomplished by internships in the social services, law enforcement and medical communities.

The microcomputing facilities available to our students are among the best in the nation. The students have at their disposal top line statistical software packages and access to an extensive library of national and international data and to one of the finest research library collections in the world.

In the spring of 2007, the sociology department added a new gender studies track for students who want to focus on gender roles and gender issues.

Sample Four Year Plan

View a sample four-year degree plan for a Bachelor of Art in Sociology.

Recommended Preparation

Since the mainstream of sociology is quantitative, math skills are important in dealing with statistics. A healthy curiosity about the nature of human groups is essential as is a willingness to explore alternative explanations concerning these groups.

Sociology is also offered as a Minor or an Associate Degree.

Requirements for Bachelor of Arts Degree

The major in Sociology requires a minimum of 30 credit hours in Sociology including:

  • S163 Social Problems
  • S250-251 Methods & Statistics 1 & 2
    This is a two semester course S250 is offered during the fall semester and S251 is offered during the spring semester.
  • S295 Sophomore Seminar
    This course is offered during the spring semester.
    Students are encouraged to enroll in this course the same semester they are enrolled in S251.
  • S441 Topics in Social Theory
  • This course is offered during the fall semester.
    Student must have completed S250-251 & S295 before enrolling in this course.
  • S470 Senior Seminar
    This course is offered during the spring semester

Requirements for a Minor in Sociology

18 credit hours, including:

  • S163 Social Problems
  • 15 additional hours of 200-400-level sociology courses

Advising information may be obtained from Advisor Dana Gohmann or Misti Whitaker.

Dana Gohmann
Academic Advisor
School of Social Sciences
Phone: (812) 941-2391
Office: Crestview 137
Email: dgohmann@ius.edu

Misti Whitaker
Academic Advisor
School of Social Sciences
Phone: (812) 941-2391
Office: Crestview 135
Email: mdwhitak@ius.edu

Please call the main Social Sciences office at (812) 941-2391 for an appointment.

Sociology

SOC-R 220 The Family (3 cr.)
The family as a major social institution and how it relates to the wider society. Formation of families through courtship, marriage, and sexual behavior; maintenance of families through childbearing and family interaction; and dissolution of families by divorce or death. Social change and the emergence of new familial patterns. Recommended for nonmajors.

SOC-S 163 Social Problems (3 cr.)
Major social problems in areas such as the family, religion, economic order; crime, mental disorders, civil rights; racial, ethnic, and international tensions. Relation to structure and values of larger society.

SOC-S 216 American Ethnic Diversity (3 cr.)
Themes discussed include Old World origins, current conditions, family, work, power, gender, and art. The approach is interdisciplinary. Readings are largely original accounts and include autobiographies, novels, and essays.

Sociology Advanced

PSY-P 320 Social Psychology (3 cr.)
P: PSY-P 101 and PSY-P 102. Principles of scientific psychology applied to the individual in a social situation.

SOC-R 315 Sociology of Power (3 cr.)
P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. Analysis of the nature and basis of political power on the macro level—the community, and national and international arenas. Study of formal and informal power structures and of the institutionalized and noninstitutionalized mechanisms of access to power.

SOC-R 318 The Self and Social Interaction (3 cr.)
P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. The course will examine the reciprocal link between the individual and society; more specifically, how individuals are affected by group behavior, and how the group is affected by the individual. Topics include: Socialization, the development of the self, social interaction, group dynamics, collective behavior and social movements.

SOC-R 320 Sexuality and Society (3 cr.)
P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. Provides a basic conceptual scheme for dealing with human sexuality in a sociological manner.

SOC-R 326 Masculinity & Society (3 cr.)
P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. Analysis of the meanings of masculinity. The major focus of the course is to examine how male gender roles impact the lives of men including: influences on men’s behavior, identities and interactions with other men and women. Variations by social class, race/ethnicity, age and sexual orientation will be examined.

SOC-R 327 Sociology of Death & Dying (3 cr.)
P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. This course examines inevitable and salient features of the human condition. Historical evaluation of images and attitudes toward death, the medicalization of death, the human consequences of high-tech dying, the role of the family in caring for dying loved ones. The emergence and role of hospices, the social roles of funerals, grief and bereavement, euthanasia and suicide, the worlds of dying children and grieving parents, and genocide are major issues that may be addressed. Two of the major themes of the course revolve around the idea that the way we die is a reflection of the way we live; and that the study of dying and death is an important way of studying and affirming the value of life.

SOC-R 410 Alcohol, Drugs & Society (3 cr.)
P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. This is a survey of the use and abuse of alcohol and other drugs, including extent of use, history of use and abuse, legal actions, and treatment strategies.

SOC-R 463 Inequality and Society (3 cr.)
P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. Presentation of conservative, liberal, and radical theories of class formation, class consciousness, social mobility, and consequences of class membership. Emphasis on the American class system, with some attention given to class systems in other societies.

SOC-R 495 Individual Readings/Research in Sociology (1-6 cr.)
P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. Exploration of a topic in sociology not covered by the regular curriculum but of interest to faculty and students in a particular semester. Topics to be announced. Repeatable for credit up to 9 units.

SOC-S 250 Methods and Statistics I (3 cr.)
P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology, MATH-M 118 or MATH-A 118. First semester of a two-semester course integrating methods of research and statistical analysis. Includes logic of scientific inference, theory construction, research design, and data collection.

SOC-S 251 Methods and Statistics II (3 cr.)
P: SOC-S 250. Second half of a one-year course integrating methods of research and statistical analysis. Includes logic of scientific inference, theory construction, research design, and data collection.

SOC-S 260 Intermediate Sociological Writing (3 cr.)
P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. Sociological aspects of current social issues and implications of existing and/or proposed public policies are explored. Consistency with related public policies is also addressed.

SOC-S 295 Selected Topics inSociology (3 cr.)
P: SOC-S 163 C: SOC-S 251 or permission of instructor. Topic: Sophomore Seminar. The focus on the seminar will be thinking, questioning, and writing from sociological perspectives. Students will frame sociological questions, match data to questions, develop sociological arguments, learn effective methods for doing library searches and organizing information, and then write and polish their papers. Required for sociology majors.

SOC-S 300 Race and Ethnic Relations (3 cr.)
P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. Theoretical and conceptual issues relating to racial and ethnic minority and majority groups. Comparative analysis of themes, terms, concepts, and theories of multiethnic societies; case studies of intergroup relations in non-American societies, race and ethnic groups, and collective experiences and organization of social institutions.

SOC-S 301 Topics in Gender (3 cr.)
P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. Specific topics announced each semester; examples include gender in the media, religion and gender, gender and work, gender and health, gender and politics. May be repeated three times for credit with a different topic, up to 9 credits.

SOC-S 304 Global Issues in Gender (3 cr.)
P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. This course will provide a general introduction to social issues from around the world with a focus on gender.

SOC-S 305 Population and Human Ecology (3 cr.)
P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. Population composition, fertility, mortality, natural increase, migration; history, growth, and change of populations; population theories and policies; techniques of manipulation and use of population data; the spatial organization of populations.

SOC-S 308 Global Society (3 cr.)
P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. Introduction to methods of cross-cultural analysis; study of key theories derived from comparative analysis, with emphasis on determinants and consequences of industrialization.

SOC-S 309 The Community (3 cr.)
P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. Urban, suburban, and rural communities, especially in America; community and neighborhood structure and organization; housing and land utilization; human behavior; patterns of community growth; community planning.

SOC-S 310 Sociology of Women in America (3 cr.)
P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. A brief survey of the history of women’s changing role in America, with particular emphasis on women’s legal status in this century, persistence of occupational segregation, the organization and growth of the women’s rights movement since 1960, the impact of these changes on the nuclear family, and the female self-image.

SOC-S 312 Education and Society (3 cr.)
P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology or consent of instructor. The role of educational institutions in modern industrialized societies, with emphasis on the functions of such institutions for the selection, socialization, and certification of individuals for adult social roles. Also covers recent educational reform movements and the implications of current social policies on education.

SOC-S 313 Religion and Society (3 cr.)
P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. The nature, consequences, and theoretical origins of religion; the social origins and problems of religious organizations; and the relationships between religion and morality, science, magic, social class, minority status, economic development, and politics.

SOC-S 314 Social Aspects of Health and Medicine (3 cr.)
P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. The effects of group characteristics in causing, treating, and preventing mental and physical illness; social influences in medical education, medical practice, and hospital administration.

SOC-S 315 Work and Occupations (3 cr.)
P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. Analysis of the professions and occupations; range, history, social origins, and typical career patterns of selected occupations; social characteristics of occupational and professional groups; influence of sex, education, and minority group membership upon selection of a profession or occupation.

SOC-S 319 Science and Society (3 cr.)
P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology or consent of instructor. Issues such as development and structure of the scientific community; normative structure of science; cooperation, competition, and communication among scientists; scientists’ productivity, careers, and rewards; development of scientific specialties; and relationship between science and society.

SOC-S 320 Deviant Behavior and Social Control (3 cr.)
P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology or consent of instructor. Analysis of deviance in relation to formal and informal social processes. Emphasis on deviance and respectability as functions of social reactions, characteristics of rules, and power and conflict.

SOC-S 321 Sexual Diversity (3 cr.)
P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology or consent of instructor. Sociological examination of patterns and variations in several dimensions of human sexuality, sexual definitions, incidence of various behaviors, intensity of sexual response, sexual object choice, and other modes of sexual expression.

SOC-S 325 Criminology (3 cr.)
P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. Causes of crime, organization of criminal behavior from the viewpoint of the person and the group, and social responses to crime.

SOC-S 328 Juvenile Delinquency (3 cr.)
P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. Nature and extent of juvenile delinquency, its cause, juvenile delinquency and the law, methods of research in juvenile delinquency, theories and practices of delinquency control.

SOC-S 329 Women and Deviance (3 cr.)
P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. Using theoretical models of women and deviance, this course examines gender norms and roles in crime. Detective fiction, mental illness, alcoholism, drug addiction, lesbianism, rape, and abortion.

SOC-S 331 Sociology of Aging (3 cr.)
P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. Examination of theoretical issues and practical problems associated with aging. Emphasis on social and social-psychological dimensions, with some treatment of the demographic, political, economic, and familial aspects of old age. Topics include consequences of research methods and findings, how experiences of younger people affect their subsequent adaptations to old age, American cultural values and norms with respect to older people, and predictions concerning the quality of life for elderly persons in the twenty-first century.

SOC-S 335 Race and Ethnic Relations (3 cr.)
P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. Relations between racial and ethnic minority and majority groups; psychological, cultural, and structural theories of prejudice and discrimination; comparative analysis of diverse systems of intergroup relations.

SOC-S 338 Sociology of Gender Roles (3 cr.)
P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. Exploration of the properties, correlates, and consequences of sex-gender systems in contemporary societies. Emphasis on defining sex-gender systems; tracing their historical development; considering their implications for work, marriage, and fertility, with cross-cultural comparisons.

SOC-S 360 Topics in Social Policy (3 cr.)
P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. Specific topics announced each semester; examples include environmental affairs, urban problems, poverty, and population problems. May be repeated three times for credit with a different topic.

SOC-S 361 Cities and Suburbs (3 cr.)
P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. Introduction to theory and research on the changing scale and complexity of social organization (urbanization), the quality of life in urban areas, demographic and ecological city growth patterns, and public policy concerns in contemporary urban society.

SOC-S 403 Industry, Labor, and Community (3 cr.)
P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. Organizations studied from a sociological perspective. Theories and typologies of organizations as well as research that tests them. Attention to social structures (formal and informal) of organizations, the participants (management, labor, and clients), organizational goals, effects of technology and the environment.

SOC-S 405 Selected Social Institutions (3 cr.)
P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. An examination of one or more institutional areas, e.g., religion, education, the military. Repeatable for credit up to 9 units with permission of instructor.

SOC-S 413 Gender and Society (3 cr.)
P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. Explores several theories of sex inequality in order to understand the bases of female-male inequality in American society; examines the extent of sex inequality in several institutional sectors; and considers personal and institutional barriers women face, including those resulting from socialization, discrimination, and other structural arrangements.

SOC-S 416 The Family (3 cr.)
P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. The family as a social institution, changing family folkways, the family in relation to development of personality of its members, disorganization of the family, and predicting success and failure in marriage.

SOC-S 418 Sociology of Political and Religious Movements (3 cr.)
P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. Analysis of the major types of political (reform, revolutionary, and reactionary) and religious movements (cults, sects). Emphasis on their nature, ideology, and organization.

SOC-S 419 Social Movements and Collective Action (3 cr.)
P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. Change-oriented social and political collective action and consequences for groups and societies. Resource mobilization, historical and comparative analysis of contemporary movements and collective action.

SOC-S 420 AdvancedTopics in Deviance (3 cr.)
P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. Specific topics announced each semester, e.g., crime, juvenile delinquency, law enforcement, corrections, mental illness, sexual deviance, drug use, and violence.

SOC-S 423 Sexual Patterns and Variations (3 cr.)
P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. Sociological examination of patterns and variations in several dimensions of human sexuality. Emphasis will be placed on sexual nonconformity (homosexuality, premarital relations, etc.).

SOC-S 426 Control of Crime (3 cr.)
P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. Analysis of policies for prevention of crime and treatment of criminals on basis of knowledge regarding causation of criminal behavior.

SOC-S 431 Topics in Social Psychology (3 cr.)
P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. Specific topics announced each semester, e.g., socialization, personality development, small group structures and processes, interpersonal relations, language and human behavior, attitude formation and change, violence and aggression. May be repeated three times for credit.

SOC-S 436 Public Opinion and Propaganda (3 cr.)
P: SOC-S 163 or 3 credit hours of introductory sociology. Techniques of propaganda, with emphasis on war propaganda; propaganda as an instrument of social control; role of propaganda and opinion measurement. Credit not given for both SOC-S 436 and JOUR-J 423 or POLS-Y 316.

SOC-S 441 Topics in Social Theory (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 163, SOC-S 250, SOC-S 251. Topics include development of American sociology; classical sociological theory; contemporary sociological theory.

SOC-S 447 Theories in Social Change (3 cr.) P: SOC-S 163, SOC-S 250, and SOC-S 251. Introduction to the social mechanisms of change. Explores various conditions that result in social change, such as technological advances, reform movements, and revolution. The results of social change such as modernization, rationalization, and urbanization are examined in terms of how they affect various institutions.

SOC-S 468 Research Problems in Sociology (1-3 cr.)
P: 6 credit hours in sociology. Instructor’s consent. An independent research project, formulated and conducted in consultation with a faculty sponsor, culminating in an analytical paper. Repeatable for credit up to 9 units.

SOC-S 470 Senior Seminar (3 cr.)
P: SOC-S 163, SOC-S 250, SOC-S 251. Topics in sociology and sociological applications.

SOC-S 494 Field Experience in Sociology (1-6 cr.)
Faculty-directed study of aspects of sociology based on field experience, in conjunction with directed readings and writing. Specifically, each intern is required to (1) keep a daily or weekly journal, which is given at regular intervals to the faculty sponsor; (2) give an oral report once the fieldwork is completed; and (3) depending on academic credit, write a journal or an analytic paper or both. In combination with SOC-S 495, may be repeated for credit up to nine units.

SOC-S 495 Individual Readings/Research in Sociology (1-6 cr.)
P: 6 credit hours in sociology and written consent of instructor. To be taken in conjunction with advanced sociology courses to meet requirements of the Sociology Honors Program. May be repeated when topics vary for up to a maximum of 6 total hours.

SOC-S 498 Honors Thesis Seminar I (1-3 cr.)
P: Consent of the instructor for SOC-S 470 required. C: SOC-S 470. To be taken in conjunction with SOC-S 470 to meet the requirements of the Sociology Honors Program. Repeatable for credit up to 12 units.

SOC-W 100 Gender Studies (3 cr.)
Interdisciplinary approach to core discipline areas and to methodological and biographical tools required for research in women.

Students have the opportunity to work closely with faculty on projects and individual study programs. They will enter into a mentoring relationship with the resident faculty so they can be exposed to our service and research.

Many will work with the Applied Research and Education Center on evaluation and needs assessment projects in the community. This community exposure will serve as the corridor to the world of work during and after their years at the university.

Our students will eventually go to work in the private and public sectors doing work which requires them to write, speak and reason well. Their experiences working in groups will prepare them for the types of leadership positions most of our graduates hold.

The Professional Practice Program provides an opportunity for students to obtain paid employment, on-the-job training and course credit. Professional Practice students have been employed by local probation offices, social service agencies, hospitals and retail businesses.

Career Links for Sociology Majors

 

Resident

Faculty Bio Thumbnail
Benjamin Asare
Professor of Sociology
basare@ius.edu
Phone: (812) 941-2291
Office Location: CV 131
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Melissa S. Fry
Assistant Professor
Director of the Applied Research and Education Center
frym@ius.edu
Phone: (812) 941-2105
Office Location: CV 013
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Sara C. Hare
Associate Professor of Sociology
SCHARE@ius.edu
Phone: (812) 941-2161
Office Location: CV 008
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Greg Kordsmeier
Assistant Professor of Sociology
gkordsme@ius.edu
Phone: (812) 941-2860
Office Location: CV 025
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Veronica Medina
Assistant Professor of Sociology
vemedina@ius.edu
Phone: (812) 941-2297
Office Location: CV 003
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Greg H. Phipps
Senior Lecturer in Sociology
Coordinator of Sociology
ghphipps@ius.edu
Phone: (812) 941-2173
Office Location: CV 129
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Adjunct

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Angie Andriot
alandrio@ius.edu
Phone: (812) 941-2391
Office Location: CV 140
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Mary Fant
mfant@ius.edu
Phone: (812) 941-2391
Office Location: CV 140
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Linda Jasper
ljasper@ius.edu
Phone: (812) 941-2391
Office Location: CV 140
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Scott R. Marx
rmarx@ius.edu
Phone: (812) 941-2391
Office Location: CV 140
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Jonetta Weber
jonweber@ius.edu
Phone: (812) 941-2391
Office Location: CV 140
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Sociology Honors Program Admissions Requirement

Admission to the Sociology Honors Program requires the following:

  • the student must be a sociology major with junior standing
  • the student must have a 3.3 GPA in all courses

Honors Program Requirements

In addition to meeting the requirements for the sociology major, the honors student must complete:

  • S495 (one hour) in conjunction with three advanced sociology courses
  • S498 (one hour) taken in conjunction with S47
  • Honors students must maintain the 3.3 GPA in all courses

SOCIAL SCIENCES CONTACT INFORMATION