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is no more likely to cheat or be promiscuous than

anyone else. Some people assume bisexuals become

straight or gay when they are in a monogamous

relationship.

Woody Allen once said, “Bisexuality immediately

doubles your chances for a date on Saturday

night.” He was making a joke, but this is just

another example of a bisexual stereotype. There are

numerous generalizations about appearance, hair

length, or masculine/feminine traits. Stereotypes

are often misleading. Bisexual women who have

longer hair and have a stereotypically feminine

look are assumed to be straight, whereas women

with short hair who wear more masculine clothing

are assumed to be lesbian. Men who are not

stereotypically masculine are assumed to be gay,

based upon speech features or clothing choices

that might be interpreted as markers for sexual

orientation. “With so many people questioning

their sexuality, some bisexuals begin to question

their own sexuality,” says Landford.

Dr. Alfred Charles Kinsey, a controversial but

influential sexologist who founded the Kinsey

Institute at Indiana University, developed a scale by

which one’s sexual tendencies could be determined.

The scale went from 0-6, zero being totally

heterosexual (no homosexual tendencies) and six

meaning homosexual (no heterosexual tendencies).

Kinsey determined, through his research, that very

few people fall into either of these categories; most

people fell somewhere in between, which would

classify them as bisexual.

In their book,

The Janus Report on Sexual

Behavior (1993)

, Samuel and Cynthia Janus

found, through their broad scale survey of 3,000

participants ages 18-90, that 5 percent of men

and 3 percent of women identified as bisexual,

while 4 percent of men and 2 percent of women

identified as homosexual. Sometimes called the

“invisible majority” of the LGBT community,

because there are slightly more people who identify

as bisexual than gay, bisexuals are caught in the

middle between the straight community and the

lesbian/gay community. In 2011, the Williams

Institute looked at four national and two state

level population-based surveys and found that

3.5 percent of the population (approximately 9

million people) in the United States identify as

LGBT. Those who identify as bisexual (1.8 percent)

slightly outnumber those identifying as lesbian or

gay (1.7 percent).

When asked how bisexuals are treated at IU

Southeast, Audrey says she has had no problems

and bisexuality is more accepted on campus than

off campus (family, friends and the public) or

on the Internet. “In my experience on campus,

most people I have come out to haven’t really

had a problem with it. I come out to anyone if it’s

relevant to the conversation or if I know them. I

haven’t really had any problems on campus with

anyone.” One can find biphobia on the Internet

from straight sites and LGBT sites and forums.

Both communities tend to believe there is no such

thing as bisexuality which is the most hurtful

misconception to someone who is bisexual.

The country is moving toward equality for the

lesbian and gay community and acceptance of

their lifestyles but is moving more slowly for

bisexuals and transgendered persons. The bisexual

community simply wants their sexuality to be

recognized as legitimate.

Sometimes called the

“invisible majority” of the

LGBT community, because

there are slightly more people

who identify as bisexual than

gay, bisexuals are caught

in the middle between the

straight community and the

lesbian/ gay community.