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Conference at a Glance
September 24, 2021
Time Event
9:00 a.m. Welcome
Dr. Robin K. Morgan, ILTE Director, IU Southeast
9:05 a.m. Introduction
Dr. Kathryn Girten, Acting Chancellor, Indiana University Southeast, and Chancellor, IU East
9:15 a.m.

Keynote: "Assessment – A Straightforward, Scalable, Sustainable Approach"

Dr. Hitesh Kathuria,
Assistant Vice President, University Academic Affairs
Director, Office of Collaborative Academic Programs (OCAP)
Indiana University
Associate Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry
Indiana University East

10:30 a.m. Transition Period
10:40 a.m.

Concurrent Session 1

11:30 a.m. Transition Period
11:40 a.m.

Concurrent Session 2

12:30 p.m. Transition Period
12:40 p.m.

Concurrent Session 3

1:30 p.m. Transition Period
1:40 p.m.

Concurrent Session 4

2:30 p.m. Conference Ends

Concurrent Session 1

Time:

10:40 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

Available Sessions:

Planning for Flexibility in Our Courses

Meeting Room A – ID# 83448466683

Kathryn Ernstberger, Ph.D., Indiana University Southeast

A well-designed course must have structure, assessment, and a clear schedule. However, given the many responsibilities, obligations, and interests of our students, providing some flexibility is often necessary. During this session, we will generate ideas for building flexibility into various aspects of a course while maintaining consistency across students and not overly burdening faculty. The benefits and limits of such planned flexibility will be discussed. Participants will be asked to share the positive impacts that they have observed from offering such flexibility as well as difficulties they have encountered.

Teaching Through the Pandemic: What Did We Learn?

Meeting Room B – ID# 85497315315

Suparna Mukhopadhyay, Ph.D., Indiana University Southeast

Transitioning to an online modality, within a very short period was indeed a great challenge for all educators around the globe, be it K12 or a four-year college. There are also two sides of the coin when it comes to the experience perspective; the challenges the educators faced being thrown into this stressful situation abruptly and the students who now face tremendous challenges adjusting to a virtual non-traditional world of learning. Staying organized, being flexible and empathic to the needs of our students, staying connected to students and fellow educators, and seeking proper guidance and training for the virtual modality are some key factors which helped in coping and survival in this unprecedented situation. This interactive session will focus on difficulties faculty faced during the pandemic, how they overcame their individual situations, and insights into how I succeeded in these transitions being an already trained pre-pandemic online educator.

Management to Mentorship of Disruptive Students

Meeting Room C – ID# 88336201784

Joan Poulsen, Ph.D., Indiana University – Purdue University Columbus

In this presentation, theory and narratives are woven together to understand management and mentorship of disruptive students, and an interactive case study discussion will help participants apply information from this session to realistic situations (from mild to severe) in the classroom. Instructors often approach disruptive students with punishments and by threatening exclusion (removal from class). This creates a dynamic in which students experience and fear rejection by the instructor. Research (Williams, 2001) demonstrates that rejected persons sometimes withdraw from interaction, but other times may exhibit anger or misbehavior. If rejection is experienced enough in academic settings, this may mark the classroom setting as a trigger for such a response. As instructors, rather than threatening rejection, we ought to consider a counterintuitive approach of extending acceptance and positive regard (Rogers, 1951), building rapport through a pattern of inclusion. The student then learns that this instructor offers acceptance, and that they are an included person in the class. In both students observed over an entire academic year in the case study, these formerly highly disruptive students amended their behavior and became highly engaged in appropriate ways in class. Participants will learn relevant theory and hear narratives of two case studies, apply it in several vignettes, and discuss their own challenges and successes with inclusion of disruptive students.

Inclusive Online Learning: What COVID-19 Taught Us and Continues to Teach Us about the Role of Critical Thinking, Dialogue, and Inclusion Within the Virtual Classroom

Meeting Room D – ID# 81735043817

Alexandra N. Sousa, Ph.D., Indiana University Southeast

Although the direct impacts of COVID on our teaching are beginning to pass, we need to make sure we continue to capitalize on this unique opportunity to (re)reflect, reconceptualize, and redefine virtual (and all) learning. We need to move beyond the observations and experiences we had "in the moment" to solidify important lessons that should not be lost as we "return to normal." I’d like to use this presentation as an opportunity to be in conversation about three topics in particular: critical thinking, dialogue, and inclusion within the virtual classroom. I want to better understand the insights gained by faculty during COVID-19 and how we can better commit to these ideals in any classroom format.

Concurrent Session 2

Time:

11:40 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Available Sessions:

Creating Inclusive Classrooms for TGNB Individuals: Moving Beyond She/He/Them

Meeting Room A – ID# 83448466683

DeDe Wohlfarth, Psy.D., Spalding University
Colton Groh, M.A., Spalding University
Hunter Gatewood, M.A., Spalding University

Despite social and legal advances, members of the TGNB (Trans/Gender Non-Binary) community continue to face interpersonal and institutional discrimination. For example, TGNB individuals report high levels of physical and sexual violence, harassment, and discrimination based on their gender identity (Hendricks & Tesla, 2012; Keo-Meier & Fitzgerald, 2016). This discrimination has been linked to behavioral and physical health disparities (Gonzales & Henning-Smith, 2017; Meyer, 2003), including internalized transphobia that often presents as depression and paranoia (Keo-Meier & Fitzgerald, 2016). Although higher education is generally viewed as a more affirming space, TGNB individuals often experience high levels of microaggressions and microinvalidations from peers, faculty, staff, and advisors (Goldberg, Kuvalanka, & Dickey, 2018). In reaction to these experiences, TGNB individuals often alter their appearance and expression in such a way that it fits a more stereotypical gendered appearance at the cost of their own comfort (Goldberg, Kuvalanka, & Dickey, 2018). These experiences often lead TGNB individuals to feel as if they do not belong in higher education and that their identities will not be respected or affirmed by their peers or professors (Goldberg, Kuvalanka, & Dickey, 2018). In our presentation, we will share specific, doable, research-based practices to create spaces that are affirming to TGNB individuals that move past the simple yet important recommendation of sharing of our pronouns. The workshop will feature active learning components, including self-reflective activities, small group discussions, large group discussions, and a commitment to action.

A New Framework for Analytical Rubrics

Meeting Room B – ID# 85497315315

Tom Parry, Ph.D., Indiana University Kokomo

Analytical rubrics are one of the most popular forms of assessment in higher education. A variety of rubric frameworks currently exist, however, many have at least one fundamental flaw especially when considering their use for scoring and grading. This presentation will introduce a new framework for rubric design (PPLL) which addresses these flaws and includes logical alignment between performance criteria, levels, and descriptors. Participants will have an opportunity to create rubrics using this format for a number of different types of assignment.

Pushing Pedagogy into Practice: A Course Design That Delivers

Meeting Room C – ID# 88336201784

Stephanie Pratt, Ph.D., Indiana University Kokomo

How does pedagogy and theory impact your course delivery? Or does it? In all actuality pedagogy and teaching/learning theories should be the foundation of both the teaching and learning environment. Recognizing these important functions aides in creating a quality classroom with impactful learning outcomes. While using this approach, faculty and students alike, have a clear description of course layout and flow. Incorporating pedagogy and learning theories in a meaningful way provides an avenue to link teaching strategies, course activities and assessments back to course/program learning outcomes. Incorporating these key principles will create an enriched teaching and learning environment, improve satisfaction with course delivery, and improve student success. The presentation will challenge participants to think about their course pedagogy and then consider how they can implement active learning styles of teaching into their curriculum.

Delivering Peer Feedback to Learners with Microsoft Power Automate

Meeting Room D – ID# 81735043817

Kim Daugherty, PharmD, Ph.D., Sullivan University
Sarah Raake, PharmD., Sullivan University
Ben Stephens, Sullivan University

There are many benefits to peer assessment. One great way to collect this feedback is through rubrics. The rubric process has been made easier with the advent of Google Forms, Office Forms, and other digital tools. Despite these new digital tools, faculty still find themselves buried in data after large presentations. To solve this problem, our College has begun using an automated process using Microsoft Power Automate. Power Automate essentially links various Office tools together. In our new peer review process, the completion of an Office Form generates an Outlook email to the student being assessed that contains pre-defined fields that were chosen by the faculty member. This process has saved us a great deal of time but has also raised an interesting question. How much control should a faculty member have over the peer feedback a student receives? Please join us to discuss the role of the faculty member in the peer feedback cycle. To foster this conversation, we will be exploring three options for providing peer feedback to students. These will range from a faculty-created report to a fully automated system using Microsoft Power Automate. Please join us for a session that will range from the theoretical to the practical. Participants who have access to Power Automate through Office.com will have an opportunity to try out creating their own automated process. If you do not have access to Office.com, please still attend to participate in an interesting conversation focused on managing time constraints while maintaining educational best practices.

Concurrent Session 3

Time:

12:40 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.

Available Sessions:

"I Didn't Know We Could Do That!" Coaching Students and Faculty to Create Equitable Learning Opportunities

Meeting Room A – ID# 83448466683

Adria Hoffman, Ph.D., Virginia Commonwealth University

Students' socioeconomic status affects how they negotiate learning opportunities as early as elementary school (Calarco, 2011). Middle class students request help more frequently, though "teachers and classroom rules provided little explicit guidance about when to seek help and how to do so" (Calarco, 2011, p. 878). Middle-class students bring to the classroom these resources, while students from lower SES backgrounds need to gain these resources in school (Bourdieu, 1977; Lamont & Lareau, 1988). Seeking help as a form of cultural capital extends to the university level where, over the last five decades, the achievement gap continued to widen (Duncan & Murnane, 2011; Fiske & Markus, 2012). Yet, this so-called achievement gap is actually an opportunity gap that we have the agency to narrow. Students can ask for an extension, the opportunity to revise and resubmit an assignment, or even to raise a final grade, if they know that these opportunities exist. In a graduate course focused on family-school partnerships, I ask students about their behaviors throughout their higher education programs. Often, I hear, "I didn't even know we could do that!" When I mentor faculty who bemoan students' absence from office hours or failure to complete assignments and ask for help, I share how I coach students. They, too, often respond, "I didn't even think to do that!" Using an interactive presentation and workshop activities (fishbowl modeling and small-group role play), participants will practice coaching strategies to empower students to seek help from university faculty and resource centers, creating more equitable outcomes.

Student Experience of Structure and Infrastructure in Online Learning: What Works for Them and What Doesn't

Meeting Room B – ID# 85497315315

Susan L. Popham, Ph.D., Indiana University Southeast

Most effective teachers know that the more they can build familiar structures into their courses, the better students will learn. Indeed, much of the advice for building online courses emphasizes this very notion: build structures into courses that are consistent and clear, so that students can navigate the online course easily and without unnecessary roadblocks. However, we know very little about how students actually navigate through their online courses. Do they prefer familiar structures that echo their experiences of face-to-face courses? Conversely, do they prefer a structure that is unique to the online environment? Do they prefer the same online structure across all their online courses? Beyond the overt structure of the online course, what other infrastructural resources do they find effective? What infrastructures do they ignore or overlook? Finally, do they employ navigation "hacks" and infrastructure shortcuts in their online courses that are not anticipated by online course builders? This presentation will share the results of a survey of local students on how they navigate and experience online courses, in hopes that audience members will learn what structures and infrastructures students will use and will help them succeed.

Beyond Asynchronous: The Guided Run Approach to Remote Learning

Meeting Room C – ID# 88336201784

Robert W. Rennie, Ph.D., Indiana University Southeast

During COVID, I tried to lead by example in showing compassion for myself and especially for my students. I began by asking, "what might students be able to glean from my class now that literally everything has changed?" In the face of the pandemic, I wanted to show leadership in the face of fear. While reminding students of their assignments, I made sure to ask them, "how are you doing? No, really, how are you?" That question resonated with them and reminded me that while I was isolated at home, helping my students mattered more than ever. It was then that I realized the term "asynchronous" did not reflect reality. When my students signed on to class, it is a synchronous moment for them. That realization changed my approach to teaching. Rather than providing canned lectures, I took inspiration from the Nike Run Club app, which provides guided runs - recordings that make you feel like a running coach is alongside you. Since no such resource existed, I built it myself, spinning up podcasts to guide students through the process of setting up a basic time management planner using a simple notebook. These included moments of humanity; to tell my students they were doing a good job, and I worked to keep humor and morale high in my classes. In doing so, I realized that teaching online is anything but remote – it is, at its best, a holistic realization of what education truly is: the practice of freedom.

Social Justice in Classrooms: Including Conversations on Body Size and Anti-Fat Bias

Meeting Room D – ID# 81735043817

DeDe Wohlfarth, Psy.D., Spalding University
Alex Tinsley, MA, Spalding University

Social justice movements have increased our awareness and engagement of diversity. However, diversity initiatives primarily have focused on race, gender identity, and sexual orientation. These topics are absolutely important, but weight and body size are almost entirely excluded. Avoidance of conversations about body size further perpetuates stigmas that contribute to anti-fat bias, which remain socially acceptable ways to oppress and discriminate (Nutter et al., 2018; Puhl, 2008). Anti-fat biases present themselves in healthcare settings, hiring processes, dating and friendship choices, advertising, social media, real estate decisions, and, most relevant for us, in our classrooms (Puhl & Brownell, 2003). Because these biases are largely unexamined and "too hot" to discuss, classroom spaces can quickly become unsafe for those living in larger bodies. Microaggressions toward people with larger bodies are rife in education and contribute to students' motivation to attend class, relationships with others, increased stress, unhealthy behaviors, and overall decreased physical and mental health, including depression and social isolation (Nutter et al., 2016; Puhl & Brownell, 2003). Weight bias conversations must also include understandings of group heterogeneity, intersectionality, and internalized biases (Mena & Quina, 2019). In our presentation, we will work to create a learning space safe for all, modeling what we strive to create in our classrooms. Through reflective activities, we will explore our own anti-fat biases. We will practice person-first language in small group exercise. Finally, we will share some tentative tips for increasing your comfort level to ensure people of all body sizes feel welcome in our classrooms.

Concurrent Session 4

Time:

1:40 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Available Sessions:

Learning Strategies: Foundations for Student Success

Meeting Room A – ID# 83448466683

Heaven Hollender, Ph.D., Indiana University – Purdue University Indianapolis

The transition from high school to college can be difficult for several reasons. A common response from students is that the work required in college requires them to think at a deeper level to understand the material. Commonly, students struggle to learn material in their freshman year as they engage in the same study techniques used in high school, even though the material at the college level necessitates a different level of understanding. Learning strategies can help in the freshman year, but often students implement the same strategies they used throughout high school with poor results. In fall 2020, students (n=71) in three sections of a First Year Seminar (FYS) courses were introduced to a project on Metacognitive Study Strategies. The project included a variety of different study strategies that could be implemented to facilitate their academic work at the university. The project culminated with the application of these strategies to prepare for an exam in another course. Project reflection data demonstrated students valued this module, especially the variety of learning strategies introduced, and had a positive effect on their academic performance in courses that semester. This presentation will outline the Learning Strategies Project, provide examples of strategies used in this project, and discuss faculty reflections on the outcomes and learning strategies project. Attendees will be engaged in hands-on learning activities demonstrating these strategies and will leave with ideas on how to implement these strategies in a variety of different courses in the curriculum.

Multiple Modes of Mind Mapping

Meeting Room B – ID# 85497315315

Lisa Potts, Ph.D., Spalding University

Mind mapping is a way to visually represent ideas around a central concept through word association and linkages to related concepts. This technique has been shown to be an effective method for learning and integrating information (Paul et al. 2021). This presentation will introduce educators to the concept of mind mapping, its effectiveness for teaching and learning, and how it can be used in the classroom, both online and in-person. Examples will be provided to demonstrate how mind mapping can be utilized to improve student engagement, as a teaching and learning aide and as an assessment tool. The presentation will be delivered in an informational and interactive workshop-like format. After hearing some brief information explaining what mind mapping is and examples of its effectiveness as a learning tool, participants will have the opportunity to try mind mapping in multiple formats and brainstorm how they might utilize this tool in their own courses. Finally, resources for digital mind mapping will be shared. The goal is that, whether new to mind mapping or not, participants will leave this session having added a new tool to their teaching toolbox and gained some practical ideas for easily implementing it in the classroom.

What a Technical Writer Can Teach You about Assignment Design

Meeting Room C – ID# 88336201784

Tim Roberts, M.A., University of Louisville

Want to ensure your students understand your assignments so they can succeed, and you can get better learning and evaluation outcomes? Learn how from an experienced technical writer turned college English instructor. Using the tech writing concepts of Scan, Read, and Remember (SRR) and Purpose, Task, Result (PTR), we'll work in teams to take existing assignments and turn them into clear, understandable, and success-generating assignments for students.

Inclusive Excellence in Our Classrooms

Meeting Room D – ID# 81735043817

DeDe Wohlfarth, Psy.D., Spalding University
Colton Groh, M. A., Spalding University
Haleh Jortani, M. A., Spalding University
Hunter Gatewood, M. A., Spalding University

Inclusive Excellence’s central tenet is that a rich inclusion of diversity is paramount to building academic excellence on college campuses (Williams, Berger, & McClendon, 2005). Including diversity is a central strategy to achieving better student learning outcomes, motivating learners, reducing educational barriers for students from minoritized backgrounds, and closing the gap on achievement and retention disparities. Although grounded in the theory of Inclusive Excellence, our presentation will focus on practical recommendations to implement in diverse classrooms. Attendees will leave our workshop with 20+ recommendations to create academic spaces that honor, welcome, and integrate the intersecting diversity of students and faculty. This list is not meant to be prescriptive or exhaustive, but merely suggestions to consider. Specifically, we will discuss tips on how to create syllabi using principles of inclusive excellence, incorporate culturally relevant examples and texts, explore our own biases, bring up the topic of microaggressions, apologize after committing a microaggression, assign students to groups, challenge imposter syndrome, handle offensive jokes, and manage classroom dynamics when a class has an “only” (a single student representing one marginalized identity.)

View downloadable agenda. For additional assistance with the IU Southeast Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Conference Program, contact the ILTE office at seilte@ius.edu.

Campus Events

Sigma Kappa EC Meeting

Sigma Kappa EC Meeting

September 26th, 2021

2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Sigma Kappa Formal Meeting

Sigma Kappa Formal Meeting

September 26th, 2021

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Weekly Home Group Meetings

Weekly Home Group Meetings

September 26th, 2021

6:30 PM - 8:00 PM

Advising Week Events

Advising Week Events

September 27th, 2021

11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Monday Bible Study

Monday Bible Study

September 27th, 2021

12:15 PM - 1:15 PM

Advising Week Events

Advising Week Events

September 28th, 2021

11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Spectrum Fall 2021 Meetings

Spectrum Fall 2021 Meetings

September 28th, 2021

6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

IUS SPECTRUM Health

IUS SPECTRUM Health

September 29th, 2021

4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

Thinkfast! - Title IX Edition

Thinkfast! - Title IX Edition

September 29th, 2021

5:30 PM - 7:00 PM

Pre-Connect Study

Pre-Connect Study

September 30th, 2021

6:00 PM - 7:00 PM

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