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Conference at a Glance
2020
Time Event
9:00 a.m. Welcome
Dr. Robin K. Morgan, ILTE Director, IU Southeast
9:05 a.m. Introduction
Dr. Ray Wallace, Chancellor, IU Southeast
9:15 a.m.

Keynote: "There’s a technique for that! Evidence-based teaching strategies for online and blended courses"
Dr. Claire Major: Consultant, Teacher, Researcher, and Writer

10:30 a.m. Transition Period
10:40 a.m.

Concurrent Session 1

11:30 a.m. Transition Period
11:50 a.m.

Concurrent Session 2

12:30 p.m. Transition Period
12:40 p.m.

Concurrent Session 3

Concurrent Session 1

Time:

10:40 a.m.

Available Sessions:

Watch Out! Things Are Jumping off My Screen: Using Augmented Reality in Our Classrooms

Zoom Link
Meeting ID: 960 9793 7013

Dr. Sumreen Asim, Indiana University Southeast

The presentation will share augmented reality (AR) educational technology tools that were used as part of the elementary education methods course that have helped with increased student engagement with science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) content learning. The inspiration for using AR comes from the 2016 craze of the PokémonGo game. Specifically, the use of these tools is in response to the Indiana Department of Education strategic six-year STEM initiative focusing on inquiry and project-based learning. I will share what worked well and what did not. Participants will be immersed in a “hands-on” experience with some easy to use AR tools across content areas. The tools shared will be dependent on a quick poll that will be given “live” during the first few minutes of the presentation. Participants should be ready to be engaged in this experiential session with various apps that are compatible with iPhones/iPads. You will leave the session bubbling with possibilities.

Synchronous Learning: How "Live" Weekly Zoom Sessions Developed a Sense of Community, Personal Accountability, and Deeper Learning in an Online Course

Zoom Link
Meeting ID: 947 4431 3208

Dr. Heather A. Labansat, Tarleton State University

This "conversation" style presentation will allow the audience to engage and discuss experiences in online instruction and ways to implement strategies to build community, accountability, and deeper learning for students taking online courses. The presented study was a SoTL project that was conducted in an 8-week, online Social Psychology course. Students were split into 2 groups - a control group and an experimental group. The course was conducted identically, with the exception of the independent variable. IV: Students in the control group were given student-learning outcomes for each chapter covered, which were written in question format. Students were told these would help them focus as they read the chapter and help them prepare for the exam. Students in the experimental group meet up weekly on Zoom and discussed the questions together. The professor led the group and would read the questions and have students respond. Research Questions:

  • Did students achieve a deep learning stage (Moon, 1999) and acquire a sense of community within their on-line course?
  • Did synchronous exercises built in discussion groups facilitate deep learning, measured on test questions designed to measure critical thinking, short answer essay (2 paragraphs).
  • Did students, after participating in synchronous discussion groups, report a sense of community and report higher cognitive engagement, social engagement, and personal reflection?
  • What is the effect of synchronous learning on Instructor/Student interaction tasks on both deep learning, perceived learning satisfaction & engagement for on-line students?

The Quantitative & Qualitative Results will be discussed. We will also discuss suggestions from students and author to make the experience more successful and effective.

A Joke, a Pun, and a Meme All Walk into a Classroom: Using Humor to Combat Burnout

Zoom Link
Meeting ID: 957 7641 0065

Dr. Ann Glazer Niren, Indiana University Southeast
Dr. Rebekah Dement, Indiana University Southeast

Burnout: the feeling of being stressed, overwhelmed, and unprepared. We have all likely experienced it, both as students and as instructors, but many are reluctant to discuss it—despite its potentially detrimental effects. While burnout may be unavoidable, this session aims to provide simple prevention and coping strategies, focusing on humor in particular, to help. Utilizing humor in various forms in lectures, assignments, discussions, exams, and even in the syllabus can reduce the stress hormone cortisol and can release endorphins, the so-called “feel good” hormone. Studies have shown that when endorphins are released in a social setting, they promote feelings of togetherness and help with community bonding—and what better place to promote community building than in our classrooms! This interactive session, led by two award-winning educators with a combined total of 40 years of classroom experience, will discuss the literature on the use of humor in the classroom, boosted by their own educational experience. In addition, the presentation seeks to engage participants in examples of humor through sample assignments and syllabi, and through the use of role-playing. Faculty are encouraged to bring syllabi and assignments that they wish to make more entertaining while maintaining the educational benefits.

Practicing Cultural Humility to Motivate Learners

Zoom Link
Meeting ID: 938 8438 9621

Dr. DeDe Wohlfarth, Spalding University
Lashawn Ford, MA, Spalding University
Colton Groh, MA, Spalding University
Haleh Jortani, BS, Spalding University
Shanika Goodspeed,MA, Spalding University
Ameenah Ikram, MA, Spalding University
Demi Zoeller, MA, Spalding University

Cultural humility is an alternative paradigm to the prevailing view of multicultural competence. After an interactive explanation of these two views, we will summarize research supporting why evidencebased teaching must also be culturally responsive teaching to maximize the learning of all students, including but not limited to: students of color, LGBTQAI+ students, and students marginalized by society, including females, first generation and low socio-economic status background people. We will (politely) challenge views about colorblindness, culture having nothing to do with hard sciences, misperceptions about students committing more microaggressions than professors. We will encourage participant discussion to explore how culture interacts with the subjects we teach. Understanding the intersection of our course content and privilege, racism, and oppression is a critical step to creating a more level playing field for all students with equal opportunity to resources.

Our presentation will conclude with a list of 12 suggestions of how to put cultural humility into practice in a college classroom, including sharing specific inclusive language to consider using on a syllabus, and tips onbringing up microaggressions in class, handling offensive jokes, crushing imposter syndrome, and managing classroom dynamics when a class has an “only” (a single student representing one marginalized identity.) Our audience will be engaged throughout by short activities, think/pair/shares, an almost word-free/picture-only PowerPoint, multiple presenters representing marginalized identities, relevant personal stories, and high energy/passionate presenters who care enough about our topic to read research about it even during a global pandemic.

 

Concurrent Session 2

Time:

11:40 a.m.

Available Sessions:

Embracing and Supporting Domestic and International English Learners in All Teaching Modalities

Zoom Link
Meeting ID: 960 9793 7013

Dr. Donna Albrecht, Indiana University Southeast

Changing demographics, a declining birthrate, a shortage of a highly trained workforce, and a multitude of options for post-secondary education create a greater awareness of the importance of our domestic and international students who are English learners in our classes. This student group provides a rich resource for the development of cultural and global competencies for all our students. Currently, 20 percent of US college students and 24 percent of community college students are second-generation Americans (Community College Consortium for Immigrant Education, 2015). This session will support instructors with strategies to make their teaching accessible and assist them in understanding what to expect with their English as a second speakers. Instructors will be introduced to tools for making teaching more comprehensible in any teaching format (including online).

Teaching, Failing, Learning, Failing Again: Dealing with Failures in College Teaching

Zoom Link
Meeting ID: 947 4431 3208

Dr. Donna Elkins, Spalding University
Dr. Robin Hinkle, Spalding University

This interactive presentation will focus on the idea of teacher failures in the classroom and how one can move forward from these failure experiences whether new to teaching or a more mature teacher. Opening discussion will focus on how we define and perceive failure. Participants will be surveyed using live polling to find the most common types of failure they have experienced (such as student complaints, poor student evaluations, students not performing well, mistaken assumptions about student abilities or knowledge) and led through an exercise to outline their stories about how and why those failures occurred. Basing a revised understanding of the role of failure in Stuart Firestein’s 2016 book Failure: Why Science is So Successful the goal is to share narratives that explore the underlying “humanness” of being a college professor and encourage appreciation for even those things that do not go well. Narratives from the presenters will focus on the lasting lessons they have learned from teaching failures, what they have attempted to do differently, and times they have experienced the same failures more than once. Through the lens of what teaching failure actually means, participants will be encouraged to be more open about teaching failures, even those they are unable to correct, and to explore them through narratives and autoethnographies to share encouragement with others who have faced similar failures and will likely face more teaching failures in the future.

Student Preference and Performance: Can Audio Content Like Podcasts Stand-In for Traditional Print Reading Assignments?

Zoom Link
Meeting ID: 957 7641 0065

Dr. Jamie Oslawski-Lopez, Indiana University Kokomo
Dr. Gregory Kordsmeier, Indiana University Southeast

Many sociology instructors are integrating audio content like podcasts as assignments. For instance, a quick review of the TRAILS database reveals instructors’ incorporation of podcasts from Planet Money (King 2017), Sawbones (Kordsmeier 2016), and This American Life (Ramirez 2013) among others (Lotspeich 2011). This turn to audio content as “reading” raises many questions. For one, given the option of both audio and print content, which do students prefer and why? Further, how does exam performance differ by chosen “reading” format? To investigate these questions, we assigned two podcasts and provided each in audio and print / transcript formats in two sections of Introduction to Sociology. In our presentation, we will discuss preliminary results of a short survey about students’ reading preferences as well as correlations between chosen “reading” format and exam performance.

The Wright Brothers, Branch Rickey, Martin Luther King, Steve Jobs, and You: Using Simon Sinek's "Start With Why" Concept to Create a Purpose-Driven Course

Zoom Link
Meeting ID: 938 8438 9621

Tim Roberts, MA, University of Louisville

We know what to include in our course and how to teach the content, but how about the course's purpose - the "why" behind it. Using ideas from Simon Sinek's "Start With Why," we'll use examples of people who knew the "why" behind what they did and how they can inspire us to find a purpose for the courses we teach. In teams, we'll take existing course descriptions and see if we can reframe them to make them more purpose-driven. . .to find their" why.

Concurrent Session 3

Time:

12:40 p.m.

Available Sessions:

Is Innovation Worth the Hype?

Zoom Link
Meeting ID: 960 9793 7013

Alani Frederick, MSN, RN, PCCN, Ivy Tech Community College

We are encouraged to innovate, but creativity is difficult, daunting, and demanding. Willing to take a risk, a course was rebuilt after letting creativity run full force. The course was rebuilt with a threepronged focus:

  1. focusing on course objectives
  2. emphasizing activity-based learning
  3. teaching the application of material

As part of the evaluation process for the course rebuild, students were asked to participate in a survey before and after the “activity” portion of the class. The students used a 5-point Linkert scale to rate their preparedness to take an exam on the associated learning objectives. The Linkert scale is below:

1- Not Prepared; 2-Barely Prepared; 3- Somewhat Prepared; 4- Prepared; 5- Very Prepared.

Average Scores Pre Post Change
1 2.39 3.29 .9
2 2.57 3.64 1.07
3 2.46 3.30 .84
4 2.71 3.27 .56
5 2.6 3.67 1.07
Average 2.546 3.434 0.888

Using this information, we can see the average score of a student before a flipped classroom was 2.54 (Barely Prepared). After activities, the student is rated as “Prepared” with an average increase of 0.888 on a 5-point Linkert scale. This information is significant and shows a significant increase in student confidence after participating in a flipped classroom.

An update will also be provided regarding innovation in a virtual world. How difficult is it to incorporate the same principles when the face to face interaction is lost? Are we still seeing the confidence increase reported by students?

Five Forms of Interactive Learning

Zoom Link
Meeting ID: 947 4431 3208

Dr. John-Robert Curtin, Indiana University Southeast

This workshop is designed to present the five forms of interactive learning that should be built into online, blended, and face-to-face lessons in course development. It is built on the premise that in order to promote critical thinking students need several interactive opportunities to process and understand the material. The workshop also presents how students describe interactivity, which differs from the faculty definition. Concrete suggestions and examples will be presented, along with other pedagogical approaches to enrich courses. The presenter has spent over 20 years developing online courses for over 120 universities and organizations worldwide and has served on the Advisory Board of the United States Distance Learning Association.

The Rehearsal Is Revolutionary

Applying a Training of Trainers (ToT) Model to Integrated Primary Care: How Learners Become Teachers on a Multidisciplinary Healthcare Team

Zoom Link
Meeting ID: 957 7641 0065

Katherine Pine, Ivy Tech Community College

The presentation introduces a scaffolding technique to skill development through rehearsal or practice in order to allow for better recall, increased testing proficiency, and long-term learning application beyond the course. It focuses on the psychological and cognitive development of learning through practice in different locations, through different executions of assignments, and reiterations of content in larger unit or course goals. My focus has been on revolutionizing the basic public speech course to demonstrate how the skills learned can be carried through to other upper level courses and career readiness in interviewing and professionalism in the workplace. I will introduce my pedagogy practice used in my course as I redesigned the way that public presentation is taught. I will relate the research that coincides with my own findings and expands beyond my course to curriculum instruction and design across courses. I will then allow faculty to complete an exercise where they can begin building an activity or event for their classes.

Applying a Training of Trainers (ToT) Model to Integrated Primary Care: How Learners Become Teachers on a Multidisciplinary Healthcare Team

Zoom Link
Meeting ID: 938 8438 9621

Dr. Sarah Shelton, Spalding University
Dr. Steve Katsikas, Spalding University
Heather Dombrowski, M.A., Spalding University
Edna Osei Owusu M.A., M.S., Spalding University
Bailey DeSpain, M.A., Spalding University
Sarah Denen, M.A., Spalding University
John Penezic, M.A., Spalding University

An innovative HRSA-funded training initiative will be highlighted in which advanced doctoral level students in clinical psychology receive didactic training on Integrated Primary Care (IPC) paralleled with supervised fieldwork. The trainees apply their knowledge and skill set acquired using a Behavioral Health Consultant (BHC) model in the form of direct patient care while simultaneously training healthcare professionals from other disciplines via the same model. Using the Training of Trainers (ToT) model, the learners become not only direct patient care providers utilizing the BHC model but also facilitators of learning for the other healthcare professionals on their primary care teams including physicians, dentists, nurse practitioners, physicians assistants, nurses, social workers, and other healthcare workers. Integrated Primary Care is an approach that combines physical and behavioral health services to address the full spectrum of patients’ clinical presentations. A Behavioral Health Consultant works directly with patients to help them make changes to improve their overall health by addressing psychosocial determinants of health while simultaneously supporting the team to enhance collaboration. This leads to more effective and efficient patient care, increased healthcare worker satisfaction, reduced provider burnout, and better patient health outcomes. Examples of ToT didactic instruction and parallel clinical field learning opportunities will be presented conceptually. Brief case vignettes from real-life teaching and learning experiences will be highlighted with an opportunity for audience engagement through interactive discussion and role play exercises.

For a pdf copy of the IU Southeast Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Conference Program, contact the ILTE office at seilte@ius.edu.

Campus Events

Spectrum Fall 2020 Meetings

Spectrum Fall 2020 Meetings

December 2nd, 2020

6:00 PM - 7:00 PM

CANCELED: Spectrum Fall 2020 Meeting

CANCELED: Spectrum Fall 2020 Meeting

December 2nd, 2020

6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

SGA Meeting (Virtual Only)

SGA Meeting (Virtual Only)

December 4th, 2020

4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Women’s Basketball vs. Midway University

Women’s Basketball vs. Midway University

December 5th, 2020

1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Men’s Basketball vs. Midway University

Men’s Basketball vs. Midway University

December 5th, 2020

3:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Netflix Watch Party

Netflix Watch Party

December 5th, 2020

7:30 PM - 9:30 PM

Fall Classes End (Full-term)

Fall Classes End (Full-term)

December 7th, 2020

All day event

Fall Classes End (8-Week Session II)

Fall Classes End (8-Week Session II)

December 7th, 2020

All day event

Boot Camp for Online Courses

Boot Camp for Online Courses

December 8th, 2020

9:00 AM - 4:00 PM

Sojourners for Truth…Find Your Village at IUS!

Sojourners for Truth…Find Your Village at IUS!

December 8th, 2020

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Dead Day

Dead Day

December 9th, 2020

All day event

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