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How to Recognize Plagiarism

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[SOUND] Professor, is it an okay time to come in? >> Come on in. I was just reading your paper. >> How was it? >> So overall, I think it's great, but I have a few concerns. So the first one is here, where you have this direct word from someone else. You need to make sure that you use direct quotations. >> Okay. >> Whenever you're citing somebody else's words. And in parentheses you put the author and then the year. >> Okay, all right. >> Other thing I wanted to talk to you about was paraphrasing. So you don't always have to use quotations and direct quotes, cuz there's a lot of direct quotes that are going on here. >> Yeah. >> So instead what you can do is you can paraphrase, where you take your own words. You kinda synthesize what the author's saying and use your own words. >> Okay. >> And in that instance, you can still cite them but it creates a better flow for your writing. All right, okay. >> So I think if you make those changes, I think your paper will dramatically improve. >> Okay, I hope so, too. [LAUGH] I'll work on that, thank you.

Gina discusses her blog with Grace

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Hey Gina, how's it going? >> Hey Grace, I'm doing well, how are you? >> Good, what are you writing about? >> Well, I read this really cool article about drones, so I thought I would just write about it in my book. >> Okay, nice, can't wait to read it. >> I can't wait for you to read it either. >> It's going to be great. >> I hope so. There's a lot of really cool things about drones. >> Hey, Gina. >> Hey Grace. >> How's it going? >> Going well, how are you? >> Good. Hey, I read that blog article you were writing in the computer lab the other day. >> Yeah, isn't it really cool? >> Yeah, I was really impressed by your writing. >> It's actually just a copy of a news article that a professor wrote at Stanford. >> Really? >> Yeah! >> Cuz you made it seem it was you that wrote all of that. >> No. >> That's plagiarism, right? >> Well, I just copied it and put it in my blog, so that other people could read it. >> Yeah, but you have to give other people credit for their work, otherwise it's essentially against a code of conduct, so. >> Really? >> Yeah.

Grace and Gina discuss how to properly quote someone else's words and to cite the author(s)

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Hey, so I was thinking about what you said earlier about plagiarism. >> Yeah. >> I wanna give credit to ideas that aren't mine, so people know who wrote it but I was thinking about how do I go about doing that? >> There are a couple different ways you can do that. But one simple way would be if you have a quotation, a direct quote in your paper, in the end, you have a citation right after that and you have your listed references at the end of your paper. That's like the most common way. >> Where do I find this information? What do I put in the citation? >> Usually, it's the name of author, year of publication, and the page number of the citation. Just like this right here, as you can see in my paper that I'm writing right now. >> Yeah, the author, publication year and the page number are all on there. >> I see, so that makes it easier to find that information. >> Yeah. >> Cool. >> Yeah. >> Thanks. >> No problem.

Roosevelt suggests to Mike that paraphrasing can be used instead of a word-for-word quotation in order to avoid plagiarism

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Hey Roosevelt, I just finished my paper. Would you mind checking it over, see if I cited everything correctly? >> Sure, no problem. >> Awesome, thanks. >> Hm. >> Does it look okay? >> Well I noticed that you're using a lot of quotations. Maybe you should consider paraphrasing. >> Mm, yeah, then I could avoid using so many quotations. >> Yeah, paraphrasing is a great way to put things in your own words in a precise way. >> Uh-huh, that's really smart, good idea, thanks. >> No problem.

Professor Kyles tells Shuya that when she is paraphrasing in her report, she also uses 7 or more words in sequence from the source

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[SOUND] Come in. >> Hi Professor Kyles. >> Hello. >> How are you? >> Good. Please, have a seat. >> Thank you. So I got an email from you. Is there any problem with my paper? >> It seems that there's a possibility of plagiarism. >> Plagiarism, no. I think I used the quotation marks when necessary in the paper. >> Yes, you did proper citations when you do direct quotes or use quotation marks but for this other part here. >> Okay, here? >> Yeah, see, you took nine words in a row from the original article, but don't use... but didn't use quotation marks. >> Okay, I was meaning to paraphrase that part. See, I changed all the other words in the sentence. >> Yeah, so when you use more than seven words in a row, you have to use quotation marks. >> Okay, so my sentence was plagiarized, as I took more than seven words in a row from the original source? >> Exactly. >> Okay, I see. So I'll try to paraphrase more, or use quotations mark. >> Yes, yes. So next time just pay close attention to plagiarism. >> Okay. >> All right. >> Thank you for your advice. >> You are welcome. So, I'll see you in class. >> Okay, see you. >> Okay.

Professor Kyles points out that Roosevelt has committed plagiarism

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Hey, Roosevelt. >> Hi, Shuya. How's it going? >> Good, how are you? >> Good. [SOUND] >> Yes, come on in. >> Hi, Professor. >> Hey, Roosevelt, how are you? >> I got your email about my paper. I have some questions about a paragraph that I wrote. You said that I was plagiarizing. >> You're right. Do you see the quotations here? >> Yes. >> Well, Roosevelt, whenever you directly quote somebody else, you should indicate the exact page number at the end. >> I see, I must have forgot about that. Okay, I will make the corrections tonight, and I will turn it in tomorrow. Is that okay? >> That sounds good. >> Okay, cool.

Sam helps Gina to avoid plagiarism in a paper she is writing

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Hey. >> Hey Sam, how are you? >> Pretty good how are you? >> I'm doing well, what have you been up to? >> I actually just came from my professor's office hours. Yeah, he went over my paper with me and I forgot to put quotation marks on. >> Show me where at? Okay. >> I can take a look at your paper, if you want me to. >> Yeah, actually, I would love that, please any help I can get. I just want to make sure I'm not plagiarizing it. >> Absolutely. >> I talked to Trace about it today. >> Well, I made sure that I knew what I was doing, he didn't just tell me what to do, so I understand it now and right here. >> Yeah, >> Okay, so- >> So you had a quotation, but you didn't do the quotation marks. >> So those can be hard sometimes. All right, can you look at this one? Is this one right? >> Yes. >> Cuz I was confused about how to do this one. >> Yeah, you did everything perfectly. >> Yeah. >> Yeah. >> Okay, awesome. I'm glad we got that figured out.

Shuya and Mike read each other's papers to see if they committed any plagiarism

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My God, I finally finished this 30-page long paper. What a work. >> Well done, congratulations. I just finished mine, too. What do you say we trade papers and maybe look for examples of plagiarism and make sure they look okay? >> Sure, that sounds great. >> Awesome, there you go. Yeah, Shuya, this is really nice. Just one thing I noticed. In the first sentence here, it looks like you forgot to put the author after your citation. >> Okay. >> And then in the second sentence here, you forgot to put the year after your citation. >> Okay, l see that's right about all of that. Good catch, thank you. >> Yeah, you're welcome otherwise everything looks great. All the other quotes have the page number, the author, the year. They're perfect, really well done. >> Okay, thank you. >> Yeah, you're welcome.

Professor Galindo is grading student papers

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Okay, grading time. Let's see, David, unfortunately, I have to take two points off. You didn't provide quotations here and here, all right. My comment, please provide quotation marks if you are directly quoting someone's work. Okay, next is Sarah. Good writing, but it could have been much better if you haven't forgotten the years after the author's names.

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